Search Result for 'Whittle', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Vikings at Waterloo: The Wartime Work on the Whittle Jet Engine by the Rover Company

by David S Brooks

This is, sad to say, a dull book about an exciting topic. It concerns itself with the wartime development work on the Whittle jet engine done by the Rover, Lucas, and Rolls-Royce companies up to 1943 in the Waterloo Mill area of England.

Gulf 917

by Ray Gillottti

The 917 story told from a specific angle, that of the John Wyer team whose tech chief really made the car fly. You may have stacks of 917 books already but you’ll not want to miss this one.

The First Jet Pilot: The Story of German Test Pilot Erich Warsitz

by Lutz Warsitz

In just a few short years Warsitz went from fledgling sport flier to chief test pilot at Peenemünde West. What he knew was so valuable that the Russians hauled him off to Siberia after WWII when he wouldn’t spill the beans!

The Spitfire: An Icon of the Skies

by Philip Kaplan

There’s a ton of Spitfire books. This one adds something. People who flew or otherwise know the Spit inside out tell you what makes this airplane different, and, well, better.

Aspects of Motoring History

by Malcolm Jeal (ed.)

This annual publication by the SAH’s UK branch covers a wide range of subjects, many of which too esoteric to be examined by anyone else.

Mezek a Turbina: Messerschmitts in Czechoslovakia

by Bohumír Kudlička

The Czechs built German aircraft. Surprised? There’s much to be surprised at in this interesting little book!

Great Aviation Collections of Britain

by Ken Ellis

Britain is at the forefront of the worldwide aviation heritage movement and this book introduces some its foremost collections and explains what makes their key holdings important and how they were acquired.

An Account of Partnership
 – Industry, Government and the Aero Engine

by M.C. Neale, editor

Bulman played a crucial role in getting Britain’s embryonic WWII aircraft development off the ground. Intrigue and politicking, groundbreaking ideas, all the big names in the aero industry of the day make an appearance.

Britain’s Greatest Aircraft

by Robert Jackson

Radar, jet engine, ejector seat, VTOL—these are just some of the technologies that carry a “Made in the UK” label. The book describes the design, development, and operational highlights of 22 significant examples of British fixed-wing aircraft.

Heroes and Landmarks of British Aviation

by Richard Edwards and Peter Edwards

Higher, faster, further. This book traces the successes and failures of the men and women—and even the industry as a whole—that advanced aviation.

Jaguar XJR7

by Ted West, photos by P. Harholdt

Racing improves the breed, so it is said. The Jaguar XJRs five-year run may not have made the accursed road cars any better but they certainly had enough of a halo effect to stabilize the brand’s slipping fortunes.

Sound Barrier: The Rocky Road to Mach 1.0+

by Peter Caygill

Shake, rattle, and roll—that’s the sound barrier at around 500 mph. This book explains how and why it happens, and how this difficult obstacle was overcome.