Archive for Author 'Sabu Advani', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Lawrie Bond, Microcar Man

by Nick Wotherspoon

Bond was involved with so much more than the 3-wheelers everyone associates with him. This expanded version of an older book offers even more detail and sheds light of the art and science of a small company building small vehicles.

Testbeds, Motherships & Parasites

by Frederick A. Johnsen

Written by a USAF historian this book showcases the flying laboratories that test the seemingly obvious and the utterly obscure bits without which safe aviating would be anything but.

Fighting the Great War at Sea: Strategy, Tactics and Technology

by Norman Friedman

A highly analytical examination of an aspect of WW I that gets overlooked a lot: naval activities. In a way, trade, and therefore the sea, was both a root cause and then an ongoing strategic goal in the war.

911R

by Mäder, Konradsheim, Gruber

This Porsche is certainly having a moment these days, both in terms of collector car prices and literature. A book like this makes you want to be a 911 owner, just to have a legitimate reason for owning it

Bentley R Type

by Bernard L. King

A complete listing of every car built of this model, complete with technical specs, basic history, and photos. Lots of photos. Hundreds of photos. If you’re in the market for an R Type or have one already, this book is required reading. There will be a test.

Sports Car Racing in Camera 1950–59

by Paul Parker

This is now the third In Camera book about sports cars by this author and this publisher. As the title would suggest, it is the photographs that are at the core of this series. Readers who already know any of the other books will have high expectations, which will not be disappointed here.

Recaro – Seating in Motion

by Frank Jung

Synonymous with seats, Recaro is a whole lot more—no wonder considering the firm is now 110 years old. This book takes a colorful look.

The Age of Hot Rods


by Albert Drake 


If you follow rodding, Drake’s name will ring a bell. For years and decades this rodder and writer has contributed to magazines and written books and this latest compilation makes it easy for new rodding enthusiasts to see what sitting at the feet of their elders would have been like.

Soviet Spyplanes of the Cold War

by Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov

Well-illustrated histories of the “real” planes are accompanied by detailed descriptions of plastic scale model kits and commentary concerning their accuracy and available modifications.

Forghieri on Ferrari: 1947 to the Present

by Mauro Forghieri & Daniele Buzzonetti

The youngest, the longest-serving, and the most successful Ferrari engineer to date speaks candidly of his life working on some of the most iconic sports and racing cars. A long-overdue and much-needed book.

Lady Lucy Houston DBE, Aviation Champion and Mother of the Spitfire

by Miles Macnair

Picture this: an air force is fighting for its very survival. A private citizen offers to buy her impoverished government several squadrons of fighter planes. The government says—no. This snub kickstarted a chain of events that culminated in Britain developing one of the important aircraft of all time.

The Royal Flying Corps 1914–1918

by Peter G. Cooksley

Absolutely one of the better books on the subject, which is probably why it keeps getting re-issued. Great at the human-interest level and a solid Big Picture introduction to the service that really validated aviation and thereby served as a model for all air forces.