Archive for Author 'Sabu Advani', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Gentleman Heroes

by Giles Chapman with Clare Hay

If there is such a thing as “the most recognizable Bentley,” this may be the one. It didn’t win a lot, it didn’t hold up very well, but it played a singular and important role. And its price today is in the stratosphere.

Dornier Do 335 Pfeil/Arrow

by J. Richard Smith and Eddie J. Creek

Fast the Arrow was but it never flew in combat. It made its greatest contribution to aviation during post-WWII testing by the Allies, aided by the German experts who had originally built it. From origins to “what if” studies, this book has it.

The Douglas B-18 and B-23: America’s Forsaken Warriors

by Dan Hagedorn Sr. & Dan Hagedorn Jr.

Jack of all trades, master of none. That’s history’s verdict, but is it deserved? The authors have spent years researching the subject and many of their arguments have generic application to the question of institutionalized bias and uncritical journalism.

Gustav Mesmer, Flugradbauer

by Stefan Hartmaier (editor)

A trilingual story of a German inventor/artist/poet who wants to fly—by means of a human-powered flying bicycle or strapping wings to his back. Don’t laugh. It’s a sad story. Or is it?

The British Overseas Airways Corporation: A History

by Graham M. Simons

BOAC operated from the 1940s to 1974 and the transition from war- to peacetime, and the resulting new world order are important topics even aside from this book’s airline theme.

Simply Bev . . . “Determination is Everything”

by James H Cox

Often enough books are described as “a labor of love”—by which is meant a love for or of the subject sufficiently compelling to shoulder the burden of writing a book. Certainly this is true in this case, except that it couldn’t possibly have been a “burden” since its subject is a flesh and bones human being.

Shelby American Up Close and Behind the Scenes

by Dave Friedman

The years at Shelby’s first premises in Venice were critical and the people who worked there young and enthusiastic, Friedman among them. His photos are an insider’s look at that most American of outfits.

Bunty – Remembering a Gentleman of Noble Scottish-Irish Descent

by Halwart Schrader

A biography of a car dealer? Well, a legendary car dealer. Not always for the purest of reasons, though.

You’ll just have to read the book . . .

Aston Martin DB: 70 Years

by Andrew Noakes

That Aston Martin is going strong today is largely due to a fellow in the 1940s who had money enough to spare, for long enough to take AM to the top tier.

The VW Bus: History of a Passion

by Jörg Hajt

A veritable cult car these days, the ubiquitous VW transporter was a workhorse in all corners of the globe, ridden hard and put away wet. Read here what makes it special.

The Zeppelin

by Michael Belafi

A new book adds a few new wrinkles to the epic story of a revolutionary idea that ended up loosing traction. The airship idea is not dead but will its time ever really come?

100 Years Ago, Anniversary of the Armistice

by Tom Dine

Bentley Motors is 100 years old and this little book celebrates the company founder’s achievements—and that’s before he ever built his eponymous cars and winning Le Mans five times.