Archive for Author 'Bill Ingalls', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Memories Of The Moon Age

by Lukas Feireiss

The book is small enough to slip into your coat pocket but deals with big ideas about our celestial neighbor and also life and the meaning thereof right here on terra firma. From the ancients to modern pop culture, everyone has something to say about the Moon.

Something New Under the Sun, The History of America’s First Car

by Carol Jean Lambert

Not, not Henry Ford but the author’s great-grandfather, in 1891. Didn’t know that? Well, this book is well intended, and colorful, but a bit light on the sort of data that engineering folk would crave.

The Human Archaeology of Space

Lunar, Planetary and Interstellar Relics of Exploration

by Peter Joseph Capelotti

Capelotti teaches archaeology and concerns himself with both terrestrial and aerospace archaeology. Here he successfully achieves his goal of gathering “into a single source the data on the artifacts that Homo Sapiens have discarded in space and place them into the framework of archaeology.”

We Speak from the Air, WW2 Broadcasts from the RAF

by the Ministry of Information

Read this alongside some of Winston Churchill’s speeches and there won’t be a dry eye in the house. The over 1000 RAF and WAAF personnel that made these wartime broadcasts remained anonymous but the highly personal pictures they paint cut to the bone.

Superman, The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero

by Larry Tye

Little Orphan Annie and Oliver Twist have more in common with the Man of Steel than you might think and this is only of many surprising connections this book makes.

Early Soviet Jet Fighters

by Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov

Today’s Su-47 Berkut stealth fighter seems impossibly advanced considering how rocky the Soviets’ start in the jet game was. Lots of new photos and material from previously classified sources shed light on a poorly documented but important chapter of aviation history.

Some Unusual Engines

by L.J.K. Setright

You don’t need to be an engineer to appreciate this book but after reading it, you’ll feel as if you are one! Engines, mostly British, for pretty much anything that moves are discussed here by an author with a sharp tongue and a sharp mind.

Hypersonic

by Dennis R. Jenkins & Tony R. Landis

Over their 199 flights, the three X-15s obliterated records and returned benchmark hypersonic data for aircraft performance, stability and control, and materials. This book is so thorough you could probably build an X-15 from scratch!

The Art of Space

by Ron Miller

The moon and the stars and rocketships and, yes, aliens—here are examples of how artists throughout history and based on the scientific knowledge of their day have imagined that Final Frontier.

Mercer Magic

by Clifford W. Zink

Worth millions today, these high-performance cars were built by the heir to a bridge-building dynasty who died tragically on the Titanic. But wait, there’s more, a lot more. And it’s all here in the first complete history of the Mercer automobile.

Physics For Gearheads

by Randy Beikmann

Unless you believe a hamster in his wheel—or that tiger in the tank—is what makes your car move, why not explore the science behind it all? This book makes it—almost—easy!

Rocket Development with Liquid Propellants

by W H J Riedel

In 1939 the author became Chief Designer at the V-2 rocket development center. Prior to that, he helped early German rocket designer Max Valier develop a series of CO2 and liquid oxygen-alcohol rocket engines and rocket-driven cars to promote Heylandt products.