Archive for Author 'Bill Wolf', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

That Thin, Wild Mercury Sound

by Daryl Sanders

Bob Dylan’s first album was released in 1962. Since then he has recorded over three dozen studio albums. He is still actively recording and performing. With all that material, it would be difficult to pick a favorite, but there seems to be a general agreement that his 1966 Blonde On Blonde is the best of the best. Sander’s book tells a very detailed, very lively tale of its making.

3-D Movies

by R.M. Hayes

The “hyperhaptic visuality” in Avatar in 2009 may have created a lot of hoopla—only to then fizz out again—but the 3D film process was already over a hundred years old by then! From specific movies to how they’re made and on what equipment, this book by an industry insider is a good overview.

Decoding Dylan

by Jim Curtis

The most elusive, enigmatic, inscrutable and problematic songwriter of the Rock era—is it really possible to decode Bob Dylan’s songs? Is Jim Curtis, an academic, up to the task? Read our review and decide for yourself. Decoding Dylan is like untangling a closet full of clothes hangers.

Rat Rod Magazine

Editor: Steve Thaemert

So ugly they are beautiful. At least to some. Rat Rods—an acquired automotive taste? Rat Rod Magazine is proudly published in the USA by veterans. In some ways it is substantially different from your typical hot rod magazine.

Want To Hold Your Hand / This Boy

The Beatles

All right, so it’s a record.. . . There’s more to life than car books, dontchaknow, and we are, after all, inquisitive folk. So read this. Or don’t.

Space Odyssey

by Michael Benson

The movie is still fantastic. It has aged very, very well. Michael Benson tells the story of its conception, gestation and birth. He did his job so well that our reviewer was too involved and engrossed to actually write a proper review, but, please, check out his attempt . . .

Orbiting Ray Bradbury’s Mars

by Gloria MacMillan, editor

Bradbury is on the A-list of classic sci-fi literature. This book examines his work through various prisms—literary, sociological, scientific. It also deals with how Bradbury was adapted to film and television. It will satisfy both Bradbury fans and Bradbury scholars

Gone With The Wind on Film

by Cynthia Marylee Molt

It was the highest-earning film for a quarter century. It set records for the total number of Oscar nominations and wins at the time. You’ve seen it, probably more than once. Before you watch it again, read this book!

Rolls-Royce

by James Taylor

Fine things come in small packages—a cliché, but, written by a proper researcher and author, this small booklet is a fine introduction to an extraordinarily long-lived marque.

Psycho, The Birds and Halloween

by Randy Rasmussen

Three classic horror films. Rasmussen’s prose takes us scene by scene into their terrors and madness. A diverting book. Light your candle on your great-grandmother’s skull, swipe away the cobwebs and, dear Speedreaders readers, read all about it.

Brunei’s Bespoke Rolls-Royce and Bentleys

by Richard Vaughan

In the days of yore, it was the Indian potentates who counted among their playthings fabulously exotic, usually custom-made cars. In the 1990s the richest man in the world was said to be the Sultan of oil-rich Brunei and he too lives large. Little is known of his vast car collection so this book definitely opens new territory.

The Rooster Bar

by John Grisham

A tale of law students growing disillusioned—about their chosen profession, their mediocre school, crushing student loan debt. The students hatch a plan, and as so many plans hatched over a drink or three, things go a bit off the rails.