Archive for Author 'Donald Capps', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

1 1/2-litre Grand Prix Racing 1961–65 – Low Power, High Tech

by Mark Whitelock

Period photos, cutaway drawings, racing stats and venues, drivers and teams—all put together by someone who paid attention at the time only to grow disappointed by later forms of GP racing. This book is his sympathetic reappraisal of a complicated era.

1982: The Inside Story of the Sensational Grand Prix Season

by Christopher Hilton

A multitude of factors conspired to make the 1982 season exceptionally turbulent and trying. Political wrangling, a driver’s strike at the first race, fatal crashes, a rather unexpected champion and more, more, more. The book is ten years old but remains a shining beacon.

World Championship

by Gregor J. Grant

The author of the iconic The Boy’s Book of Motor Sport also had his adult audience covered, with books and a weekly magazine that followed motor racing in a serious, data-intensive way.

Cooper Cars

by Doug Nye

If all you associate with the name is Mini Coopers let yourself be enlightened by this benchmark book about a hole-in-the wall racing shop that diced with the big boys.

Cars at Speed, Classic Stories from Grand Prix’s Golden Age

by Robert Daley

Two of the serious must-have racing reads are under this author’s byline. They are among his earliest work and possibly even more thrilling to read today—because no one does it like this anymore—than they were then.

The 9th Infantry Division in Vietnam: Unparalleled and Unequaled

by Ira A. Hunt Jr.

This book was written by someone who was there—and is here reviewed by someone who was also there. And the two points of view could not be less similar, raising the eternal question: how can a reader who was not there know what is true?

Autocourse 2016–2017

by Tony Dodgins, editor

The joys—and burdens—of wanting/needing to buy an annual motorsports book. Once you start, you really cannot sit out a year, can you?

The Magnificent Monopostos: Alfa Romeo Grand Prix Cars 1923–1951

by Simon Moore

The third of three books about important prewar racing Alfas. Very thorough, very pricy, very much worth it. Even covers Alfa GP-engined powerboats.

Lotus 18: Colin Chapman’s U-Turn

by Mark Whitelock

“U-Turn” implies reversal, in this case moving the engine from the front to the rear, which, coupled with other Chapman goodies, made the 18 the milestone car he had been shooting for all along.

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

A Life in a Year: The American Infantryman in Vietnam, 1965–1972

by James R. Ebert

A fresh look at an older book that was once dismissed as unworthy because of who had written it and why and how. Well, there’s another side.

1967: Chris Amon, Scuderia Ferrari and a Year of Living Dangerously

by John Julian

The young New Zealander is not exactly a household name—except among knowledgeable racing enthusiasts. From technical to social aspects, the book describes many aspects of a particularly storied year in racing history.