Archive for Author 'John Aston', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

What Doesn’t Kill You . . . My Life in Motor Racing

by Johnny Herbert

Today this gifted all-round driver is praised for an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of his sport on his broadcasts for Britain’s Sky Sports F1 channel but this autobiography skips over a few bits in the name of telling a grander story.

Death Drive: There are No Accidents

by Stephen Bayley

If the car is an extension of a celebrity’s personality, then a car crash is . . . well, that’s the question this author, critic, columnist, consultant, broadcaster, curator, and museum director examines.

Bulgin: The Very Best of Russell Bulgin

by Russell Bulgin

Unicorn. Hen’s teeth. Unobtainium. The book, that is. Published posthumously by his colleagues this anthology presents some of the towering—and not just because he was 6’7”—British journalist’s choicest automotive musings.

Silverstone – the Home of British Motor Racing

by Chas Parker

First used in 1947 by a bunch of friends for some off-the-cuff racing—running over a sheep in the pursuit of speed—this former airfield drew only a year later a crowd of 100,000 for its first proper British GP. Here is the whole story, from then to 2013.

Schlegelmilch Sportscar Racing 1962–1973

by David Tremayne

An important photographer, an important period, expect to be entertained and delighted and moved the way only images can do.

Watching the Wheels, My Autobiography

by Damon Hill

A candid and intense look at a life that became complicated way before the author took up racing and became world champion.

Once In a Great City, A Detroit Story

by David Maraniss

Greatness comes before the fall, and Detroit was once great. You’ll wish you’d had the chance to experience it yourself but until it becomes great again, this book will have to suffice.

Thus Spake David E.

by David E. Davis

An acquired taste, and best to consume the bombast in small doses. Still, a distinctive and colourful voice that immeasurably enriched automotive journalism.

Brian Redman – Daring Drivers, Deadly Tracks

by Brian Redman, Jim Mullen

A really good biography of a great racer and a hugely decent man who survived his pro years—often barely—with enough good cheer to retire at age 52 and still remain active in historic racing.