Archive for Author 'Other', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Farman: De l’Aviation á l’Automobile

by Claude Rouxel, Laurent Friry

Built to last forever, Farman cars fell victim to their complexity and the value of the raw materials from which they were made. As the first serious study of the marque, there’s every reason to believe this fascinating and long-awaited book will outlast its subject.

Buckminster Fuller: Dymaxion Car

by Jonathan Glancey, Norman Foster

Fuller built three Dymaxions, not so much to build cars but to explore a concept he applied to pretty much everything in life. British architect Norman Foster built a fourth, for a 2010 exhibition in Spain, and this book tells the story of all four.

Ballot

by Daniel Cabart and Gautam Sen

The fastest cars in the world right when they came out (1919). Innovative. Good-looking. Other makers were inspired by them. Today: obscure. Now this monumental 920-page book is a most proper 100th anniversary present.

Swedish Coachbuilders – A Story of Craftsmanship

by Jan Ströman

You may not know the names, you may not even know how to pronounce them but Sweden is more than Saab and Volvo (or Koenigsegg)! This book shows how early Teutonic influences gave way to more original expressions.

The State of American Hot Rodding

by David Lawrence Miller

As American as Jazz but hot rodding is the very picture of old-school—so how will the hobby attract the next generation of enthusiasts?

Dirty Work

by Richard Vaux with Brad Kuhn

June, 1985. Cairo to San Diego. You probably remember hearing on the news that the plane was hijacked. There are even two movies—but until you read this book, you have no idea what really happened.

Follmer: American Wheel Man

by Tom Madigan

From throwing around VW Beetles in parking lots as a young kid to being the oldest F1 débutant since the 1950s, Follmer is the consummate racer. Long retired, you can still find him at vintage races, often in the same cars!

Selling the American Muscle Car: Marketing Detroit Iron in the ’60s and ’70s

by Diego Rosenberg

Just the name “muscle car” was enough to make traditional car buyers—adults, male, conservative—shudder at the thought of running into hotrodders and hooligans at the showroom. Quite the pickle for the carmakers’ marketing folks.

Studebaker and Byers A. Burlingame

by Robert R. Ebert

As CEO, Burlingame, an erstwhile bookkeeper at Packard, was given the hard job of turning around one of the oldest names in the automotive field when the company was in deep trouble. He did, for a while.

Masters of Mayhem

by James Stejskal

Context-rich, this book is not just another flogger of the T.E. Lawrence myth. Its overarching theme is that of small, agile teams acting as a force multiplier, a concept of timeless relevance and urgency to warfighting practice.

Bud Moore’s Right Hand Man: A NASCAR Team Manager’s Career at Full Throttle

by Greg Moore with Perry Allen Wood

A look at NASCAR from the inside. Watching it on TV or even live gives you little insight into what goes on on the other side of pit wall—not always pretty and never simple.

Bonneville: A Century of Speed

by David Fetherston and Ron Main

The mythic salt flats have played an important role in motorsports for over a hundred years. This book is meant to celebrate and promote it, and back up the myth with hard data but, much like the salt itself, it has difficulties yielding a smooth, straight run.