Archive for Author 'Other', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Studebaker and Byers A. Burlingame

by Robert R. Ebert

As CEO, Burlingame, an erstwhile bookkeeper at Packard, was given the hard job of turning around one of the oldest names in the automotive field when the company was in deep trouble. He did, for a while.

Masters of Mayhem

by James Stejskal

Context-rich, this book is not just another flogger of the T.E. Lawrence myth. Its overarching theme is that of small, agile teams acting as a force multiplier, a concept of timeless relevance and urgency to warfighting practice.

Bud Moore’s Right Hand Man: A NASCAR Team Manager’s Career at Full Throttle

by Greg Moore with Perry Allen Wood

A look at NASCAR from the inside. Watching it on TV or even live gives you little insight into what goes on on the other side of pit wall—not always pretty and never simple.

Bonneville: A Century of Speed

by David Fetherston and Ron Main

The mythic salt flats have played an important role in motorsports for over a hundred years. This book is meant to celebrate and promote it, and back up the myth with hard data but, much like the salt itself, it has difficulties yielding a smooth, straight run.

Automobile Manufacturers of Cleveland and Ohio, 1864–1942

by Frank E. Wrenick with Elaine Wrenick

Automobiles made in Ohio? How about five hundretmarques! Ever hear of a Ben-Hur? If not, this book will add a whole new arsenal of automotive minutia to your lexicon.

Monteverdi: Geschichte einer Schweizer Automarke

by Gloor and Wagner

This small Swiss marque was created by an outstanding man with great vision who rose from car salesman to racer to F1 team boss, considered gasoline his drug, and owned 11,000 model cars. How could you not be interested? This is the only book about him and his cars.

Illustrated Dictionary of Automobile Body Styles

by Lennart W. Haajanen

Modern-day automotive body styles are more or less standardized but in the days of the coachbuilt car, designs—and the accompanying terminology—were bountiful. This book explains their history, often going back to the horse-drawn carriage.

The Amazing Life of John Cooper Fitch

by Art Evans

“Amazing” doesn’t even begin to exhaust the fullness of the man whose obit described him as “bathed in golden sunlight.” Pilot, racer, sailor, inventor, family man, holder of a speed record—for driving backward.

Maxwell Motor and the Making of the Chrysler Corporation

by Anthony J. Yanik

The list of Maxwell innovations is long, not just in terms of technology but also policy such as marketing specifically to women or hiring a gender-balanced sales force. Once a leading US carmaker, the original firm is long defunct but survives today in the form of Fiat Chrysler.

Byron J. Carter

by Dean M. Nelson

If you’ve never heard of a Cartercar, you’re not alone—but if your car has an electric starter, you (may) have to thank this prolific inventor, not least because it is said that not having one probably killed him!

Cuba’s Car Culture, Celebrating the Island’s Automotive Love Affair

by Tom Cotter and Bill Warner

By the 1950s Cuba had the highest per capita automotive purchasing of any Latin American country—and since the 1959 trade embargo its car-dependent population has shown the highest degree of ingenuity to keep these oldies on the road.

Bentley – Cricklewood To Crewe

by Michael Frostick

Published more than thirty years ago this book by and large represented the state of the art of what was then known and as such remains a staple in the marque enthusiast’s library.