Archive for Author 'Tom King', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Riley Sports Cars 1926–1938

by Graham Robson

As so many other British makes, afflicted as they were of a singularly Britsh way of executing industrial policy, Riley had a complicated history. This book isn’t helping, not even in regards to the small sports car segment it focuses on.

Enzo Ferrari’s Secret War

by David Manton

No, this is not about Ferrari’s “war” on the race track with Ford but his much lesser-known actions during World War II vis-à-vis the Germans. If you ever wondered why Enzo had a soft spot for New Zealanders, this book has an answer—one that reads like fiction but aparently is not.

Frontiers – A Colonial Dynasty

by Simon Best

New Zealand, that most remote of British colonies. From whalers to Rolls-Royces to two airmen of Maori descent lying buried together on a hilltop in England, this book covers four generations.

Lagonda, A History of the Marque

by Arnold Davey & Anthony W. May

Founded by a US opera singer of Scottish ancestry in 1906, this British luxury marque has had a difficult life. Owned by Aston Martin since 1947 you may soon see Lagonda-branded SUVs on the road so find out what makes Langonda special.

Inside the Rolls-Royce & Bentley Styling Department 1971 to 2001

by Graham Hull

Due to their unique place high up on the foodchain, these marques have rather unusual design parameters. Their monied customers’ demand for a recognizably traditional look are difficult to reconcile with modern, even forward-looking design trends. A long overdue book.

The Riley M.P.H.: A History of Its Development & Production 1932–1935

by Robin Cameron

Blink—and you missed it! Not because it’s so fast but because it was offered for only half a year and in all of 14 copies. Like many other makers’ “Vitesse” or “Speed” models Riley’s “MPH” was less about nominal speed than theidea of speed.

Art Deco and British Car Design: The Airline Cars of the 1930s

by Barrie Down

Some of the most beautiful cars ever built were made during the 1930s, in Europe and America, and Down’s eagerly awaited book showcases the cars that reflected the Art Deco school of design.