Archive for Items Categorized 'Automobiles', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Ferraris in Australia in the 1950s and 1960s

by Barry Farr

Some US metropolitan areas have larger populations of Ferraris than the 65 examples of sports, race or road cars that went Down Under between 1952 and 1972 when the Australian Ferrari Register was founded. The author is a native and a Ferrari owner and so has the motivation and the connections to trace the cars.

Cobra Pilote: The Ed Hugus Story 

by Robert D. Walker

Old as the Cobra story is, there still is entirely new information out there—here from someone who was not only there but well and truly made it all possible. Two years before he died he finally let someone write his story.

Park Ward: The Innovative Coachbuilder 

by Malcolm Tucker

It’s a good time to be alive: Park Ward is a hundred years old this year but only now do we have here the first proper book about it, so thorough—over 1200 pages, and it only covers 20 years!—that it is also likely the last.

Classic Cars Review: The Best Classic Cars on the Planet

by Michael Görmann, editor

The book isn’t so much about the “best cars” but why anyone wants to collect and use and preserve anything.

Lamborghini Murciélago 

by Thillainathan “Path” Pathmanathan 

What’s a supercar really like, day in/day out, on hot dates, fast laps, and ruinous service appointments? Written by a knowledgeable owner the book looks at Lamborghini’s flagship in the context of its predecessors and tells pretty much all.

The Automobile Book

by the editors of The Saturday Evening Post

This American magazine was founded in 1821 and became a weekly in 1897 reaching millions of homes. It covered current events—and the automobile and the people behind and around it were most certainly that. Here is a collection of ads, commentaries, poems, stories, essays, reminiscences, and illustrations.

Inside the Rolls-Royce & Bentley Styling Department 1971 to 2001

by Graham Hull

Due to their unique place high up on the foodchain, these marques have rather unusual design parameters. Their monied customers’ demand for a recognizably traditional look are difficult to reconcile with modern, even forward-looking design trends. A long overdue book.

Tony Southgate, From Drawing Board to Chequered Flag

by Tony Southgate

For someone who first started to be interested in motor racing in 1982, Southgate was consistently present in the background of the races I watched.

Rolls-Royce Camargue, Crewe Saviour

by Bernard King

It was the most expensive production car in the world. It was the most British of cars—designed by the most Italian of coachbuilders. It went from clean sheet to 1:1 prototype in under three months. A mere 534 were built in 12 years. Never heard of it? Well, there’s a story.

Advertising the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud and Bentley S Series

by Davide Bassoli

Did the iconic Silver Cloud have iconic advertising? You bet, and not just the timeless Ogilvy & Mathers one about the noise of the clock. In fact, this book shows not only ads of the cars but about a host of other products, competitors, and OEM suppliers.

The Other Yellow Rolls Royce

by Neil Fraser

He’s a tinkerer with some mechanical aptitude but no vintage-car background. He bought a wreck of a 1929 Rolls-Royce. He restored it. Then he wrote this book about it. Masochism, all.

Return to Power: The Grands Prix of 1966 and 1967

by Michael Frostick

On the face of it, an interesting era in racing and an author who would pen many worthy tomes. Alas, this isn’t one of them.