Archive for Items Categorized 'Automobiles', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Gentleman Heroes

by Giles Chapman with Clare Hay

If there is such a thing as “the most recognizable Bentley,” this may be the one. It didn’t win a lot, it didn’t hold up very well, but it played a singular and important role. And its price today is in the stratosphere.

Shelby American Up Close and Behind the Scenes

by Dave Friedman

The years at Shelby’s first premises in Venice were critical and the people who worked there young and enthusiastic, Friedman among them. His photos are an insider’s look at that most American of outfits.

Bunty – Remembering a Gentleman of Noble Scottish-Irish Descent

by Halwart Schrader

A biography of a car dealer? Well, a legendary car dealer. Not always for the purest of reasons, though.

You’ll just have to read the book . . .

Aston Martin DB: 70 Years

by Andrew Noakes

That Aston Martin is going strong today is largely due to a fellow in the 1940s who had money enough to spare, for long enough to take AM to the top tier.

The VW Bus: History of a Passion

by Jörg Hajt

A veritable cult car these days, the ubiquitous VW transporter was a workhorse in all corners of the globe, ridden hard and put away wet. Read here what makes it special.

The Age of Hot Rods


by Albert Drake 


If you follow rodding, Drake’s name will ring a bell. For years and decades this rodder and writer has contributed to magazines and written books and this latest compilation makes it easy for new rodding enthusiasts to see what sitting at the feet of their elders would have been like.

Rat Rod Magazine

Editor: Steve Thaemert

So ugly they are beautiful. At least to some. Rat Rods—an acquired automotive taste? Rat Rod Magazine is proudly published in the USA by veterans. In some ways it is substantially different from your typical hot rod magazine.

Lost Road Courses

by Martin Rudow

It may have been hyped as “The Nürburgring of the Midwest” but can you even recall what state War Bonnet was in? The tracks may be long forgotten but the names and ideas they spawned—men, machines, technologies—live on.

COPO Camaro, Chevelle & Nova

by Matt Avery

No corporate ban on racing keeps a good man down. A loophole in GM’s COPO fleet-sales program became a back channel of sorts and today is recognized as the origin of GM’s top muscle cars

UFO Drawings From The National Archives

by David Clarke 

Some say The Truth is Out There. Even if it is, so is a whole load of other stuff. Fake news is not news! This delightfully left-field book shows how the UFO phenomenon has been a rich seam mined by a diversity of Britons, ranging from the self-delusional to the unsettlingly sane.

Lost Muscle Cars

by Wes Eisenschenk

A departure from the “barn find” theme, this anthology is about noteworthy cars that in quite a few of the cases related here are still MIA. There is some tradecraft discussed but mainly this is more of a mini history of specific cars.

Studebaker and Byers A. Burlingame

by Robert R. Ebert

As CEO, Burlingame, an erstwhile bookkeeper at Packard, was given the hard job of turning around one of the oldest names in the automotive field when the company was in deep trouble. He did, for a while.