Archive for Items Categorized 'Automobiles', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Something New Under the Sun, The History of America’s First Car

by Carol Jean Lambert

Not, not Henry Ford but the author’s great-grandfather, in 1891. Didn’t know that? Well, this book is well intended, and colorful, but a bit light on the sort of data that engineering folk would crave.

Mr Radley Drives to Vienna

by John Kennedy

Look closely at that cover. Looks like a color print of a b/w photo, right? No! Everything is re-staged—a hundred years apart.

First Principles: The Official Biography of Keith Duckworth OBE

by Norman Burr

He was behind the most successful engines in racing history, and his company, Cosworth, became a major player. He had the complex personality that seems inseparable from such overachievement, and this book, at last, tells the story.

The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford

by Beth Tompkins Bates

Built it and they will come. Henry Ford did a lot more than rethink the assembly line or the $5 workday. He hired African Americans and they left the South and came by the tens of thousands. What did each expect of the other?

A Life in Car Design – Jaguar, Lotus, TVR

by Oliver Winterbottom

After a half century of design—and not only cars—there are stories to tell, insights to share, and a new generation to motivate. You may have never heard of Winterbottom but this book delivers.

Sporterfolge

by Tony Adriaensens

Sporting Successes indeed. Porsche is no stranger to them but that’s not really where the success of this quite unique book comes in. It’s photos, hundreds of photos, most of which never before published.

Delage, Champion du Monde

by Daniel Cabart & Christophe Pund

The 15-S-8 model discussed here was a World Champion—but few today remember this enormous achievement. This thorough account is accompanied by fabulous period photos.

Lamborghini Murciélago 

by Thillainathan “Path” Pathmanathan 

What’s a supercar really like, day in/day out, on hot dates, fast laps, and ruinous service appointments? Written by a knowledgeable owner the book looks at Lamborghini’s flagship in the context of its predecessors and tells pretty much all.

Duesenberg, The Mightiest American Motor Car

by J.L. Elbert

Did the individual marque history genre begin in 1973, as has been argued, with the publication by Automobile Quarterly of its histories of Cadillac and Corvette? This book, now nearly forgotten, clearly set the stage nearly 25 years earlier. And it still deserves a spot on the serious enthusiast’s bookshelf.

Die Jean Bugatti Story, Eine Dokumentation

by Horst Schultz

Ettore Bugatti’s eldest son was groomed to be the future patron, but he died young. This book makes the point that he influenced both the era before his death and the one/s after it much more than other books allow.

Racer

by John Andretti & Jade Gurss

You wouldn’t know from just the book title that this story does not have a good ending, at least not in the conventional sense. Good will surely come from reading it and one would like to think that good came to the man who had the courage to write it.

Maestro Bill Mitchell: The xp-Concept Cars of GM Styling

by Roy Vernon Lonberger

The author of this book posits that the inside truth about Mitchell has not been written yet. And he would know: he was right there, as Head Designer in the Experimental Studio, with plenty of opportunity to be on the receiving end of the good, the bad, and the ugly.