Archive for Items Categorized 'British', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Park Ward: The Innovative Coachbuilder 

by Malcolm Tucker

It’s a good time to be alive: Park Ward is a hundred years old this year but only now do we have here the first proper book about it, so thorough—over 1200 pages, and it only covers 20 years!—that it is also likely the last.

Inside the Rolls-Royce & Bentley Styling Department 1971 to 2001

by Graham Hull

Due to their unique place high up on the foodchain, these marques have rather unusual design parameters. Their monied customers’ demand for a recognizably traditional look are difficult to reconcile with modern, even forward-looking design trends. A long overdue book.

Rolls-Royce Camargue, Crewe Saviour

by Bernard King

It was the most expensive production car in the world. It was the most British of cars—designed by the most Italian of coachbuilders. It went from clean sheet to 1:1 prototype in under three months. A mere 534 were built in 12 years. Never heard of it? Well, there’s a story.

Advertising the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud and Bentley S Series

by Davide Bassoli

Did the iconic Silver Cloud have iconic advertising? You bet, and not just the timeless Ogilvy & Mathers one about the noise of the clock. In fact, this book shows not only ads of the cars but about a host of other products, competitors, and OEM suppliers.

The Other Yellow Rolls Royce

by Neil Fraser

He’s a tinkerer with some mechanical aptitude but no vintage-car background. He bought a wreck of a 1929 Rolls-Royce. He restored it. Then he wrote this book about it. Masochism, all.

The Royal Udaipur RR GLK21

by Anu Vikram Singh, Narayan Rupani, Gautam Sen

From scrap heap to the Pebble Beach Concours, a little Rolls-Royce goes on a big journey.

Gentleman Heroes

by Giles Chapman with Clare Hay

If there is such a thing as “the most recognizable Bentley,” this may be the one. It didn’t win a lot, it didn’t hold up very well, but it played a singular and important role. And its price today is in the stratosphere.

Aston Martin DB: 70 Years

by Andrew Noakes

That Aston Martin is going strong today is largely due to a fellow in the 1940s who had money enough to spare, for long enough to take AM to the top tier.

Vintage Jaguar Keyrings 1955–1980

by Morrill “Bud” Marston

If you thought vintage Jaguars are interesting, just wait until you see vintage Jaguar key rings. Jaguar made over 350,000 cars during just the period covered here so there’s plenty of variety to investigate.

The Works MGs

by Mike Allison & Peter Browning

MGs were capable and therefore popular—and not super expensive to boot. No wonder they became the budding racer’s favorite mount. This book too has stood the test of time.

Kings And I, My Life With Rolls-Royce Cars

by A. David (Lieberdavid) Burdoin

One man’s cars, why he liked them, what he did with them, and the people he met along the way. (No actual kings involved!)

Under the Spotlight

by Davide Bassoli

The mere mention of the words “Earls Court show car” in a For Sale ad is bound even today to raise a car’s profile because it would have been a tricked-out example of what all a coachbuilder or carmaker could do.