Archive for Items Categorized 'British', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Vintage Jaguar Keyrings 1955–1980

by Morrill “Bud” Marston

If you thought vintage Jaguars are interesting, just wait until you see vintage Jaguar key rings. Jaguar made over 350,000 cars during just the period covered here so there’s plenty of variety to investigate.

100 Years Ago, Anniversary of the Armistice

by Tom Dine

Bentley Motors is 100 years old and this little book celebrates the company founder’s achievements—and that’s before he ever built his eponymous cars and winning Le Mans five times.

The Singer Story: The Cars, Commercial Vehicles, Bicycles & Motorcycles

by Kevin Atkinson

Everyone knows that Bugattis used distinctive flat-spoke aluminum wheels. So did Singer—but 20 years earlier. The curved front forks of a bicycle are a George Singer patent, and still in use today. If you don’t know Singer, you should.

The Rootes Story, The Making of a Global Automotive Empire  

by Geoff Carverhill 

Rootes is about as British a carmaker/distributor as it gets but US connections abound, not least the Raymond Loewy one. This book is quite the deep dive and dispenses lots of detail in a very readable manner.

Lotus Esprit, The Official Story

by Jeremy Walton

The Lotus Esprit may have held a record among British sports cars for continuous production—28 years and almost 11,000 copies sold—but pick up an automotive encyclopedia today and you’ll find that this Lotus hardly warrants a footnote.

Rule Britannia, When British Sports Cars Saved a Nation

by John Nikas

No hyperbole, this. The cars may be small but the story is big. Without selling large quantities of relatively affordable cars in export markets after WWII, Great Britain would have remained broken for much longer. How they did it, and how they lost it is the story here.

The Aston Martin Book

by René Staud, Paolo Tumminelli

If it’s specs and serious history you want, this is not the book. But if a car’s shape makes you lightheaded and its “image” excites you, this is the book.

Jaguar D-Type, The Autobiography of XKD 504

by Philip Porter & Chas Parker

You can still see this 1955 car being raced today, with abandon, and successfully. In its day it was the ultimate sports racer. Few have survived in this original a form which is why this is the one to which an entire book is devoted.

Park Ward: The Innovative Coachbuilder 

by Malcolm Tucker

It’s a good time to be alive: Park Ward is a hundred years old this year but only now do we have here the first proper book about it, so thorough—over 1200 pages, and it only covers 20 years!—that it is also likely the last.

Inside the Rolls-Royce & Bentley Styling Department 1971 to 2001

by Graham Hull

Due to their unique place high up on the foodchain, these marques have rather unusual design parameters. Their monied customers’ demand for a recognizably traditional look are difficult to reconcile with modern, even forward-looking design trends. A long overdue book.

Rolls-Royce Camargue, Crewe Saviour

by Bernard King

It was the most expensive production car in the world. It was the most British of cars—designed by the most Italian of coachbuilders. It went from clean sheet to 1:1 prototype in under three months. A mere 534 were built in 12 years. Never heard of it? Well, there’s a story.

Advertising the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud and Bentley S Series

by Davide Bassoli

Did the iconic Silver Cloud have iconic advertising? You bet, and not just the timeless Ogilvy & Mathers one about the noise of the clock. In fact, this book shows not only ads of the cars but about a host of other products, competitors, and OEM suppliers.