Archive for Items Categorized 'US', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Dean’s Garage: The Future is Back

by Gary Dean Smith

So what’s it really like to be a designer at a big carmaker? A behind-the-scenes look at GM Design from the 1950s through the ‘80s with stories, quotes, and anecdotes told by designers, engineers, and sculptors.

Murder in South Bend

by John A. Bridges

Studebaker built America’s first “people’s car.” Not!

But, what if? This novel is by a noted Studebaker historian who not only spun a yarn but is actually designing and building full-scale, running “alternate” Studebakers.

Fisher Body Craftsman’s Guild: Modeling The Future

by Richard Ray

Many a designer whose name you’d know went through this GM-sponsored industrial arts program. Their annual reunions are usually accompanied by an exhibit and lectures; this is the catalog of the 2019 event.

General Motors Parade of Progress & A Futurliner Returns

by Bruce Burghoff and George Ferris

Seeing a convoy of Futurliners pulling up would definitely make you think the future had arrived. This book covers both the travelling exhibit and the restoration of Futurliner #10 at the National Automotive and Truck Museum of the United States.

Buckminster Fuller: Dymaxion Car

by Jonathan Glancey, Norman Foster

Fuller built three Dymaxions, not so much to build cars but to explore a concept he applied to pretty much everything in life. British architect Norman Foster built a fourth, for a 2010 exhibition in Spain, and this book tells the story of all four.

American Light Trucks & Utility Vehicles, 1967 to 1989

by J “Kelly” Flory Jr

In an age in which Ford’s F-Series has been the best-selling pickup truck in the US since 1977 it’s easy to lose sight of what else was/is out there. Whether it’s to settle a bet, check a fact, or just get lost in the cars and trucks of yesteryear, Flory’s books are unsurpassed for detail and accuracy.

Studebaker Avanti Operation Airlift, May 1962

by John Hull

Studebaker planned to sell 20,000 of these luxury coupes in its launch year, 1962. It had radical styling, was the fastest production car of the time, and the world clearly wanted this type of car. A year later Studebaker threw in the towel. But no one would forget the flying circus that was this airlift.

The Ford that Beat Ferrari: A Racing History of the GT40

by John S. Allen and Gordon J. Jones 

Seen the movie? (Do!) Now read the book—or, rather, re-read this 34-year-old classic now in its 3rd and yet again improved edition.

The Last Shelby Cobra: My Times with Carroll Shelby

by Chris P. Theodore

Carroll Shelby doesn’’t seem to have had an idle day in his long life and to the end was hatching new ideas. This book by a Ford exec who worked with him looks at the last 20-odd years.

The State of American Hot Rodding

by David Lawrence Miller

As American as Jazz but hot rodding is the very picture of old-school—so how will the hobby attract the next generation of enthusiasts?

Shelby American Up Close and Behind the Scenes

by Dave Friedman

The years at Shelby’s first premises in Venice were critical and the people who worked there young and enthusiastic, Friedman among them. His photos are an insider’s look at that most American of outfits.

Michigan’s C. Harold Wills

by Alan Naldrett and Lynn Lyon Naldrett

His engineering skills were high, indeed. The car he eventually designed and built, though in small numbers, was and is to this day highly respected for its high quality. Sadly this book about C. Harold Wills is a disappointment.