Archive for Items Categorized 'US', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Something New Under the Sun, The History of America’s First Car

by Carol Jean Lambert

Not, not Henry Ford but the author’s great-grandfather, in 1891. Didn’t know that? Well, this book is well intended, and colorful, but a bit light on the sort of data that engineering folk would crave.

Duesenberg, The Mightiest American Motor Car

by J.L. Elbert

Did the individual marque history genre begin in 1973, as has been argued, with the publication by Automobile Quarterly of its histories of Cadillac and Corvette? This book, now nearly forgotten, clearly set the stage nearly 25 years earlier. And it still deserves a spot on the serious enthusiast’s bookshelf.

More Than Automobiles: The Packards of Warren, Ohio

by A.J. Balfour

Who was the first female FBI agent? Would you have known it was a Packard? Written by a longtime Packard enthusiast, the book follows two generations of Packards, using many previously unpublished images.

A History of the Legendary 4 x 4 Ford Bronco

by Todd Zuercher

The fellow who brought you the Mustang also did the Bronco, Ford’s first SUV. Now it’s being reintroduced for 2021—and there is such demand that there’s an 18-month waitlist! This book explains what made it popular.

Great Grilles of the ‘50s

by Mark Misercola and Hank Kaczmarek

More than just another look at the orgy of brightwork that marked US cars of the era this book also offers model and body codes, original MSRP, basic specs, color charts, and current values.

The Ford Model A

by Robert C. Kreipke

Ford’s original entry into the automobile world, the Model T, was a runaway success—the A was too. Almost five million would be made so it’s no wonder that there are survivors and thus an active club scene—and books such as this, by Ford’s Corporate Historian and Manager of Special Projects.

Dean’s Garage: The Future is Back

by Gary Dean Smith

So what’s it really like to be a designer at a big carmaker? A behind-the-scenes look at GM Design from the 1950s through the ‘80s with stories, quotes, and anecdotes told by designers, engineers, and sculptors.

Murder in South Bend

by John A. Bridges

Studebaker built America’s first “people’s car.” Not!

But, what if? This novel is by a noted Studebaker historian who not only spun a yarn but is actually designing and building full-scale, running “alternate” Studebakers.

Fisher Body Craftsman’s Guild: Modeling The Future

by Richard Ray

Many a designer whose name you’d know went through this GM-sponsored industrial arts program. Their annual reunions are usually accompanied by an exhibit and lectures; this is the catalog of the 2019 event.

General Motors Parade of Progress & A Futurliner Returns

by Bruce Burghoff and George Ferris

Seeing a convoy of Futurliners pulling up would definitely make you think the future had arrived. This book covers both the travelling exhibit and the restoration of Futurliner #10 at the National Automotive and Truck Museum of the United States.

Buckminster Fuller: Dymaxion Car

by Jonathan Glancey, Norman Foster

Fuller built three Dymaxions, not so much to build cars but to explore a concept he applied to pretty much everything in life. British architect Norman Foster built a fourth, for a 2010 exhibition in Spain, and this book tells the story of all four.

American Light Trucks & Utility Vehicles, 1967 to 1989

by J “Kelly” Flory Jr

In an age in which Ford’s F-Series has been the best-selling pickup truck in the US since 1977 it’s easy to lose sight of what else was/is out there. Whether it’s to settle a bet, check a fact, or just get lost in the cars and trucks of yesteryear, Flory’s books are unsurpassed for detail and accuracy.