Archive for Items Categorized 'US', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

GM’s Motorama: The Glamorous Show Cars of a Cultural Phenomenon

by David W Temple

Lower, longer, wider. Often outrageously designed—and often enough outrageously impractical for real-word use (David Davis calls them “comic book fantasies” in his Introduction)—these show cars were the most American of American cars and American lifestyle.

Kar-Kraft

by Charles Henry

Ford beat Ferrari at Le Mans. But FoMoCo didn’t do it alone. Kar-Kraft was a key contributor and Ford was pretty much its only customer. The author worked there and so can offer an inside look.

Automobile Manufacturers of Cleveland and Ohio, 1864–1942

by Frank E. Wrenick with Elaine Wrenick

Automobiles made in Ohio? How about five hundretmarques! Ever hear of a Ben-Hur? If not, this book will add a whole new arsenal of automotive minutia to your lexicon.

Shelby Mustang GT350

by Chuck Cantwell

An insider’s look at the early days of Shelby American getting into “mass production” and turning a car with sporty pretensions into a race-ready and race-worthy macine.

Something New Under the Sun, The History of America’s First Car

by Carol Jean Lambert

Not, not Henry Ford but the author’s great-grandfather, in 1891. Didn’t know that? Well, this book is well intended, and colorful, but a bit light on the sort of data that engineering folk would crave.

Mercer Magic

by Clifford W. Zink

Worth millions today, these high-performance cars were built by the heir to a bridge-building dynasty who died tragically on the Titanic. But wait, there’s more, a lot more. And it’s all here in the first complete history of the Mercer automobile.

Steve Magnante’s 1001 Corvette Facts

by Steve Magnante

On the lighter but by no means lightweight side of the large body of Corvette literature, this book will entertain and educate for a long while. Written by someone who is a sponge around all things automotive!

Creative Industries of Detroit

by Leon Dixon

Thousands of projects over several decades came out of Creative, mostly super-secret, and this is the first book about them! Well, some of them, and some of it is necessarily speculative. Still, this book answers questions you couldn’t have known you have.

The Age of Hot Rods


by Albert Drake 


If you follow rodding, Drake’s name will ring a bell. For years and decades this rodder and writer has contributed to magazines and written books and this latest compilation makes it easy for new rodding enthusiasts to see what sitting at the feet of their elders would have been like.

Ask the Man Who Owns One: An Illustrated History of Packard Advertising

by Arthur W. Einstein Jr.

Even if this book were only about the advertising, as the subtitle suggests, it would be a most interesting addition to the literature because in terms of esthetics and message Packard’s advertising was no less distinctive than its cars and is certainly worthy of an in-depth look.

The Definitive Camaro Guide 1970½ to 1981

by Jason Scott

The European-inspired Camaro was a hit in its day, especially the clean-sheet gen 2 cars discussed here. If you see one in your future, this book offers a solid foundation.

Chrysler 300: America’s Most Powerful Car

by Robert Ackerson

The “banker’s hot rod” was not an ordinary car. The 300 has a deservedly proud history, which is why Chrysler keeps bringing the nameplate back. To learn how it all started check out this book.