Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Rocket and Jet Aircraft of the Third Reich

by Terry C. Treadwell

A popular subject these days—but this book won’t be! Too inaccurate.

Flying Boats of the Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Ships of the Sky

by Richard Knott

To make the far-flung corners of their empire accessible, the British built a flying boat called—Empire. A fleet of over 40 plied the skies for a decade, until something new and better took its place.

Tumult in the Clouds: The Aviation Art of Russell Smith

by Jim Wilberg

Not only are 44 examples of Smith’s award-winning paintings shown and described but a dozen learned WW I specialists offer insights into airplanes, historic events, and the challenges of doing proper research.

The Lancaster and the Tirpitz

by Tony Iveson & Brian Milton

The subtitle calls only the bomber “legendary” but not the battleship? A good and necessary book but a bit one-sided.

Frank McClean: The Godfather of British Naval Aviation

by Philip Jarrett 

Many important aviation developments wouldn’t have happened if McClean hadn’t had the means, the skills, and the convictions he possessed. At long last here’s a book to give credit where credit is due.

Desert Boneyards: Retired Aircraft Storage Facilities in the U.S.

by Patrick Hoeveler, Adel Krämer

End-of-life questions are complicated, even for inanimate objects. Organ donor? Cremation? Cryogenics? Stuffed museum display? What happens to old aircraft when their glory days are past?

Vought F-8 Crusader: Development of the Navy’s First Supersonic Jet Fighter

by William D. Spidle

The Navy’s first fully operational supersonic aircraft would become the most successful military aircraft ever built. This book covers its design and development as well as the early stages of its operational history.

The Spitfire: An Icon of the Skies

by Philip Kaplan

There’s a ton of Spitfire books. This one adds something. People who flew or otherwise know the Spit inside out tell you what makes this airplane different, and, well, better.

The Avro Manchester: The Legend Behind the Lancaster

by Robert Kirby

If it weren’t for the subtitle many readers would probably not even know into what period to place this all but forgotten aircraft. Developed during times in which neither the technology nor the mission was entirely clear it lived a short and difficult life—but it was not for naught.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Wave-Off! A History of LSOs and Ship-Board Landings

by Robert R. “Boom” Powell

If you have even the remotest interest in flying—of any sort—or teamwork—of any sort—don’t miss this book because it’ll offer food for thought about many things!

Military Aviation Disasters: Significant Losses Since 1908

by David B.Gero

Whereas the Geneva-based Aircraft Crashes Record Office compiles and makes public statistics on aviation accidents of aircraft capable of carrying more than six passengers (excluding helicopters, balloons, and fighter airplanes), the military keeps its cards closer to the vest.