Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Tupolev Tu144: The Soviet Supersonic Airliner

by Yefim Gordon, Dmitriy Komissarov, Vladimir Rigmant

This icon of Soviet national prestige did take to the skies before the Concorde but ended up having a much shorter service life. Of the few publications devoted specifically to this aircraft, this book is the most complete yet.

Adventurous Empires: The Story of the Short Empire Flying Boats

by Phillip E. Sims

It was the most successful flying-boat airliner ever built, a majestic, beautiful aircraft. It made the world a smaller place and played a role in peace and war.

Diary of a Night Bomber Pilot in World War I

by Clive Semple

“I must now enjoy myself and not worry, otherwise I shall get nerves and that won’t do.” Far more than merely the story of a pilot, this is a glimpse of the world through the eyes of a young man with hopes, illusions, and—luck.

Comet! The World’s First Jet Airliner


by Graham M. Simons

The exclamation point isn’t really part of the plane’s name but it might as well have been. Sleek and beautiful, it ushered in a new era but paid a heavy prize for blazing the trail. The book covers everything worth knowing about it.

Transatlantic Airships: An Illustrated History

by John Christopher

From luxuriously appointed people-hauling “pond hoppers” that actually flew, to proposed atomic-powered leviathans replete with helipads this book takes a look at how to cross vast distances.

Spitfire In Sweden

by Mikael Forslund

How the Swedes got their Spitfires (postwar) is one of those on again/off again stories, but, given what use they were put to, it may have kept the Cold War a degree cooler.

A Complete History of U.S. Combat Aircraft Fly-Off Competitions

by Erik Simonsen

How do military aircraft make the cut to be selected for active duty? And the ones that didn’t, what would they have looked like if they had made it into service? On the latter score, this book is a winner.

The Quest for Speed

by Mike Roussel

Air racing was once a big thing, seemingly the catalyst for advancing aircraft technology and also public buy-in. By looking at only the Schneider Trophy, and from a very European point of view, this book is limited in its answers.

The Fairey Barracuda

by Matthew Willis

Meet the “most reviled aircraft of WW II.” And find out why things aren’t as bad as all that. It did stay in service until the mid-1950s so it must have done something right!

Avro Lancaster: The Survivors

by Glenn White

Only 17 known complete survivors of the iconic WWII bomber exist worldwide and this thoroughly illustrated book takes you to and inside them.

Drone Strike!

by Bill Yenne

Drone activities may be in the news a lot but in fact much remains—and rightly so given their purpose—behind closed doors. Yenne’s book is an excellent primer not only on what drones are capable of but how they fit into the arsenal.

Soviet and Russian Ekranoplans

Sergey Komissarov & Yefim Gordon

Duck and cover—lest a giant flying ship blows you over! These exotic things have been around on paper since the 1920s and in flight since 1935 but you still get a look of disbelief. Their day may come again.