Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

One of a Kind Research Aircraft

by Steve Markman & Bill Holder

This book was the first to introduce to the general public some of those aircraft that were hardly known outside the professional community of aircraft developers and testers. Not the headline-grabbing experimental planes but the workhorses that test everything from the durability of paint to new science.

The Curtiss Hydroaeroplane: The U.S. Navy’s First Airplane 1911–1916

by Bob Woodling and Taras Chayka

The story of the first truly successful seaplane is here told against the backdrop of the all-important human factor: how people find each other, work together, and make the sum greater than its parts.

Women Aviators

by Karen Bush Gibson

Among the 26 flyers this book for young readers portrays are many unusual choices, but they are probably representative of the obstacles their gender had to contend with.

Tupolev TU-22/TU-22M

by Yefim Gordon & Sergey Komissarov

Similar names, different aircraft. One was the first Soviet supersonic nuclear-capable bomber but failed to live up to expectations, the other a completely reconfigured improvement. This book needs no improvement.

Military, Naval and Civil Airships Since 1783

by Daniel George Ridley-Kitts MBE

Big topic, small book—but very nicely done and useful to both the casual reader and the ardent enthusiast. Airships were the first aircraft capable of controlled powered flight and knowing how they work is an essential bit of knowledge.

Wave-Off! A History of LSOs and Ship-Board Landings

by Robert R. “Boom” Powell

If you have even the remotest interest in flying—of any sort—or teamwork—of any sort—don’t miss this book because it’ll offer food for thought about many things!

Taming the Skies: A Celebration of Canadian Flight

by Peter Pigott

Fifty of the most significant aircraft in the history of Canadian aviation are discussed in good detail and with lively writing.

McDonnell Douglas F-4e/EJ/F/G/RF-4E Phantom II

by JP Vieira 

A new reference book for modelers about an aircraft for which an extensive paper trail exists. Highlighted here are lesser-known and visually striking examples.

Tupolev Tu144: The Soviet Supersonic Airliner

by Yefim Gordon, Dmitriy Komissarov, Vladimir Rigmant

This icon of Soviet national prestige did take to the skies before the Concorde but ended up having a much shorter service life. Of the few publications devoted specifically to this aircraft, this book is the most complete yet.

Adventurous Empires: The Story of the Short Empire Flying Boats

by Phillip E. Sims

It was the most successful flying-boat airliner ever built, a majestic, beautiful aircraft. It made the world a smaller place and played a role in peace and war.

Diary of a Night Bomber Pilot in World War I

by Clive Semple

“I must now enjoy myself and not worry, otherwise I shall get nerves and that won’t do.” Far more than merely the story of a pilot, this is a glimpse of the world through the eyes of a young man with hopes, illusions, and—luck.

Comet! The World’s First Jet Airliner


by Graham M. Simons

The exclamation point isn’t really part of the plane’s name but it might as well have been. Sleek and beautiful, it ushered in a new era but paid a heavy prize for blazing the trail. The book covers everything worth knowing about it.