Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Inside Marine One

by Ray L’Heureux

From building kit models to ferrying the Chief Executive of the United States, Frenchy L’Heureux’s life in aviation has put him where the front-page news took place, but behind the scenes.

Drone Strike!

by Bill Yenne

Drone activities may be in the news a lot but in fact much remains—and rightly so given their purpose—behind closed doors. Yenne’s book is an excellent primer not only on what drones are capable of but how they fit into the arsenal.

Wings of the Weird and Wonderful

by Eric M. “Winkle” Brown

He’s flown more aircraft than anyone else and has all sorts of records to his name. The 53 aircraft he found the most memorable are discussed here.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Ballooning: A History, 1782–1900

by Kotar & Gessler

Many aeronautic “firsts” were accomplished in balloons. Some records haven’t been bettered in decades (altitude, highest parachute jump). How did it start? Why didn’t it last?

Airmen’s Obituaries, Book Two

by Jay Iliff (Editor)

You may not have known Moose Fumerton, Bobbi Trout, Cyclops Brown, orGrumpy Unwin in life but you really should get to know them in death. Think of these obits as mini biographies—nothing morbid about that!

Lady Lucy Houston DBE, Aviation Champion and Mother of the Spitfire

by Miles Macnair

Picture this: an air force is fighting for its very survival. A private citizen offers to buy her impoverished government several squadrons of fighter planes. The government says—no. This snub kickstarted a chain of events that culminated in Britain developing one of the important aircraft of all time.

Hunting the Wind

by Teresa Webber & Jamie Dodson

A brief but meaningful and certainly heartfelt synopsis of the early years of the airline, in peace and war. Several of the contributors actually worked the boats and all of them bleed Pan Am blue.

The Pulitzer Air Races


by Michael Gough 




In the space of only a few years, American flyers in American planes went from footnote to superstars—thanks to a series of races few seem to remember anymore. This is the first book exclusively devoted to them.

Ultra-Large Aircraft 1940–1970

by William Patrick Dean

“Volumetric fuselage aircraft”—if that’s not a word you normally use in a sentence, read this book to get insights into a very complicated subject and some very unusual aircraft.

Tupolev TU-22 Blinder

by Sergey Burdin & Alan E. Dawes

The West feared it, the Soviets had high hopes for it, but this pioneering supersonic bomber failed to live up to either. But it looked pretty. And crews could turn unused alcohol from the AC system into “vodka.” Nastrowje.

The Quest for Speed

by Mike Roussel

Air racing was once a big thing, seemingly the catalyst for advancing aircraft technology and also public buy-in. By looking at only the Schneider Trophy, and from a very European point of view, this book is limited in its answers.