Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Tiltrotor Aircraft: An Illustrated History

by Alexander Lüdeke

In recent years, one particular tiltrotor has been in the news a lot, usually because something went wrong. Often spectacularly wrong. Why is it so hard to go up and then forward? Well, this book explains it.

Convair Advanced Designs

by Robert Bradley

Loosing faith in progress? Feeling down by too much “been there/done that”? Well, prepare to be amazed and entertained by two books that look behind the curtain. Not everything here is a flight of fancy; some of these machines were totally viable but just didn’t get green-lighted.

The 377 Stratocruiser & KC-97 Stratofreighter: Boeing’s Great Post War Transports

by Bill Yenne

“A monkey could fly this plane.” Well, no, but once six monkeys on a flight from Thailand got loose. A modified version of it was called the Pregnant Guppy and NASA considered it a lifesaver. Everything you need to know about “Tomorrow’s Airliner” is in this lovely book.

The Aircraft-Spotter’s Film and Television Companion

by Simon D. Beck

An indispensable companion when you watch a movie and wonder “What was that??” The book tells you that, and more: who flew it, who built it, where is it, was it real?

One of a Kind Research Aircraft

by Steve Markman & Bill Holder

This book was the first to introduce to the general public some of those aircraft that were hardly known outside the professional community of aircraft developers and testers. Not the headline-grabbing experimental planes but the workhorses that test everything from the durability of paint to new science.

The Curtiss Hydroaeroplane: The U.S. Navy’s First Airplane 1911–1916

by Bob Woodling and Taras Chayka

The story of the first truly successful seaplane is here told against the backdrop of the all-important human factor: how people find each other, work together, and make the sum greater than its parts.

Women Aviators

by Karen Bush Gibson

Among the 26 flyers this book for young readers portrays are many unusual choices, but they are probably representative of the obstacles their gender had to contend with.

Tupolev TU-22/TU-22M

by Yefim Gordon & Sergey Komissarov

Similar names, different aircraft. One was the first Soviet supersonic nuclear-capable bomber but failed to live up to expectations, the other a completely reconfigured improvement. This book needs no improvement.

Military, Naval and Civil Airships Since 1783

by Daniel George Ridley-Kitts MBE

Big topic, small book—but very nicely done and useful to both the casual reader and the ardent enthusiast. Airships were the first aircraft capable of controlled powered flight and knowing how they work is an essential bit of knowledge.

Wave-Off! A History of LSOs and Ship-Board Landings

by Robert R. “Boom” Powell

If you have even the remotest interest in flying—of any sort—or teamwork—of any sort—don’t miss this book because it’ll offer food for thought about many things!

Taming the Skies: A Celebration of Canadian Flight

by Peter Pigott

Fifty of the most significant aircraft in the history of Canadian aviation are discussed in good detail and with lively writing.

McDonnell Douglas F-4e/EJ/F/G/RF-4E Phantom II

by JP Vieira 

A new reference book for modelers about an aircraft for which an extensive paper trail exists. Highlighted here are lesser-known and visually striking examples.