Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

I Kept No Diary

by F.R.(Rod) Banks

If your motor requires high octane fuel it probably has high compression. Banks is the man who championed this technology—and a thousand other things—which is probably why he had no time to keep a diary. He was 80 when he wrote this book, and still working!

Hypersonic

by Dennis R. Jenkins & Tony R. Landis

Over their 199 flights, the three X-15s obliterated records and returned benchmark hypersonic data for aircraft performance, stability and control, and materials. This book is so thorough you could probably build an X-15 from scratch!

The Art of Space

by Ron Miller

The moon and the stars and rocketships and, yes, aliens—here are examples of how artists throughout history and based on the scientific knowledge of their day have imagined that Final Frontier.

Fly and Deliver, A Ferry Pilot’s Log Book

by Hugh Bergel

Ferry pilots deliver planes—military, civilian, private. It’s an interesting career or sideline, even today, and a great way to build flight time and get your hands on the controls of many different types.

Horten Ho 229

by Andrei I. Shepelev & Huib Ottens

The work of the Horten brothers, especially given their young age and the circumstances under which they worked, is very remarkable. The Ho 229 was their last and most ambitious project—yielding lessons that are still puzzling engineers.

Rocket and Jet Aircraft of the Third Reich

by Terry C. Treadwell

A popular subject these days—but this book won’t be! Too inaccurate.

Flying Boats of the Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Ships of the Sky

by Richard Knott

To make the far-flung corners of their empire accessible, the British built a flying boat called—Empire. A fleet of over 40 plied the skies for a decade, until something new and better took its place.

Tumult in the Clouds: The Aviation Art of Russell Smith

by Jim Wilberg

Not only are 44 examples of Smith’s award-winning paintings shown and described but a dozen learned WW I specialists offer insights into airplanes, historic events, and the challenges of doing proper research.

The Lancaster and the Tirpitz

by Tony Iveson & Brian Milton

The subtitle calls only the bomber “legendary” but not the battleship? A good and necessary book but a bit one-sided.

Frank McClean: The Godfather of British Naval Aviation

by Philip Jarrett 

Many important aviation developments wouldn’t have happened if McClean hadn’t had the means, the skills, and the convictions he possessed. At long last here’s a book to give credit where credit is due.

Desert Boneyards: Retired Aircraft Storage Facilities in the U.S.

by Patrick Hoeveler, Adel Krämer

End-of-life questions are complicated, even for inanimate objects. Organ donor? Cremation? Cryogenics? Stuffed museum display? What happens to old aircraft when their glory days are past?

Vought F-8 Crusader: Development of the Navy’s First Supersonic Jet Fighter

by William D. Spidle

The Navy’s first fully operational supersonic aircraft would become the most successful military aircraft ever built. This book covers its design and development as well as the early stages of its operational history.