Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The Berlin Airlift: The World’s Largest Ever Air Supply Operation 

by John Grehan

The enormity of this 1948/49 operation cannot ever be overstated. This tiny book seems an unlikely candidate for doing it justice, but it does. Exceptional!

Apollo VII–XVII

by Heyne, Meter, Phillipson, Steenmeijer

Photos you couldn’t have seen before, and thoughts you probably never thought before about how to photograph Earth from over 200,000 miles away, or the surface of the Moon from 5 ft away.

Supermarine Spitfire V

by Robert Grudzień

More than 44 color profiles of the most successful Spitfire version ever will take advanced scale modelers to a new level.

America’s Round-Engine Airliners

by Craig Kodera and William Pearce

Vibration, noise, roughness, creature comforts—early air travel really was rudimentary. The radial or star engine opened a new chapter and, for a while, was the best technical solution. But in its very advantages (cooling) lay the roots of its obsolescence (drag).

The Trans-Atlantic Pioneers

by Bruce Hales-Dutton

This year marks the centenary of the first nonstop transatlantic flight. You’d think the world would be awash in books—but this seems to be the only one! Good thing it’s a fine, if bland, one.

Hunting the Wind

by Teresa Webber & Jamie Dodson

A brief but meaningful and certainly heartfelt synopsis of the early years of the airline, in peace and war. Several of the contributors actually worked the boats and all of them bleed Pan Am blue.

Olympic Airways: A History

by Graham Simons

From weather to political leanings there’s a reason Greece was a factor in the plans of the early civil aviation schemers, and in short order the Greeks stood up a national airline of their own. It struggled then and it struggles today, and this book explains why.

Early Soviet Jet Fighters

by Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov

Today’s Su-47 Berkut stealth fighter seems impossibly advanced considering how rocky the Soviets’ start in the jet game was. Lots of new photos and material from previously classified sources shed light on a poorly documented but important chapter of aviation history.

Dornier Do 335 Pfeil/Arrow

by J. Richard Smith and Eddie J. Creek

Fast the Arrow was but it never flew in combat. It made its greatest contribution to aviation during post-WWII testing by the Allies, aided by the German experts who had originally built it. From origins to “what if” studies, this book has it.

The Douglas B-18 and B-23: America’s Forsaken Warriors

by Dan Hagedorn Sr. & Dan Hagedorn Jr.

Jack of all trades, master of none. That’s history’s verdict, but is it deserved? The authors have spent years researching the subject and many of their arguments have generic application to the question of institutionalized bias and uncritical journalism.

The First Jet Pilot: The Story of German Test Pilot Erich Warsitz

by Lutz Warsitz

In just a few short years Warsitz went from fledgling sport flier to chief test pilot at Peenemünde West. What he knew was so valuable that the Russians hauled him off to Siberia after WWII when he wouldn’t spill the beans!

Gustav Mesmer, Flugradbauer

by Stefan Hartmaier (editor)

A trilingual story of a German inventor/artist/poet who wants to fly—by means of a human-powered flying bicycle or strapping wings to his back. Don’t laugh. It’s a sad story. Or is it?