Archive for Items Categorized 'Civilian', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Balloonomania Belles: Daredevil Divas Who First Took to the Sky

by Sharon Wright

“Balloon influenza.” (Gesundheit) Women parachuting out of balloons, dangling from ropes beneath it or sitting on a trapeze, calmly reading a (car!) magazine while sailing through a rainstorm? Prepare to be surprised.

Dirty Work

by Richard Vaux with Brad Kuhn

June, 1985. Cairo to San Diego. You probably remember hearing on the news that the plane was hijacked. There are even two movies—but until you read this book, you have no idea what really happened.

The Trans-Atlantic Pioneers

by Bruce Hales-Dutton

This year marks the centenary of the first nonstop transatlantic flight. You’d think the world would be awash in books—but this seems to be the only one! Good thing it’s a fine, if bland, one.

Olympic Airways: A History

by Graham Simons

From weather to political leanings there’s a reason Greece was a factor in the plans of the early civil aviation schemers, and in short order the Greeks stood up a national airline of their own. It struggled then and it struggles today, and this book explains why.

Gustav Mesmer, Flugradbauer

by Stefan Hartmaier (editor)

A trilingual story of a German inventor/artist/poet who wants to fly—by means of a human-powered flying bicycle or strapping wings to his back. Don’t laugh. It’s a sad story. Or is it?

The British Overseas Airways Corporation: A History

by Graham M. Simons

BOAC operated from the 1940s to 1974 and the transition from war- to peacetime, and the resulting new world order are important topics even aside from this book’s airline theme.

The Pulitzer Air Races


by Michael Gough 




In the space of only a few years, American flyers in American planes went from footnote to superstars—thanks to a series of races few seem to remember anymore. This is the first book exclusively devoted to them.

Tupolev Tu144: The Soviet Supersonic Airliner

by Yefim Gordon, Dmitriy Komissarov, Vladimir Rigmant

This icon of Soviet national prestige did take to the skies before the Concorde but ended up having a much shorter service life. Of the few publications devoted specifically to this aircraft, this book is the most complete yet.

Transatlantic Airships: An Illustrated History

by John Christopher

From luxuriously appointed people-hauling “pond hoppers” that actually flew, to proposed atomic-powered leviathans replete with helipads this book takes a look at how to cross vast distances.

British Aviation Posters: Art, Design and Flight

by Scott Anthony and Oliver Green

Illustrated with advertising posters and photos, this book explores the 90-year history of Britain’s national airline from rickety biplane to the Concorde and its place in the world.

Concorde: The Rise and Fall of the Supersonic Airliner

by Jonathan Glancey

You may have missed the memo but within only the last year two major initiatives have been launched to revive supersonic civilian air travel—forty years after Concorde first tested the waters. And we know how that went.

Bill Lancaster: The Final Verdict

by Ralph Barker

Romance. Record-flying. Murder. Acquittal. Fatal plane crash in the desert: accident? suicide? What, you’re still on the fence whether you want to read this book??