Archive for Items Categorized 'Military', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

WO Bentley Rotary Aero Engines

by Tom Dine

Yes, we already posted a review of this book here but it wasn’t written by us. The book, and the circumstances of its publication, are important enough to re-review it once more but with more detail.

Drone Strike!

by Bill Yenne

Drone activities may be in the news a lot but in fact much remains—and rightly so given their purpose—behind closed doors. Yenne’s book is an excellent primer not only on what drones are capable of but how they fit into the arsenal.

Tupolev TU-22 Blinder

by Sergey Burdin & Alan E. Dawes

The West feared it, the Soviets had high hopes for it, but this pioneering supersonic bomber failed to live up to either. But it looked pretty. And crews could turn unused alcohol from the AC system into “vodka.” Nastrowje.

The Quest for Speed

by Mike Roussel

Air racing was once a big thing, seemingly the catalyst for advancing aircraft technology and also public buy-in. By looking at only the Schneider Trophy, and from a very European point of view, this book is limited in its answers.

Avro Lancaster: The Survivors

by Glenn White

Only 17 known complete survivors of the iconic WWII bomber exist worldwide and this thoroughly illustrated book takes you to and inside them.

Hypersonic

by Dennis R. Jenkins & Tony R. Landis

Over their 199 flights, the three X-15s obliterated records and returned benchmark hypersonic data for aircraft performance, stability and control, and materials. This book is so thorough you could probably build an X-15 from scratch!

Horten Ho 229

by Andrei I. Shepelev & Huib Ottens

The work of the Horten brothers, especially given their young age and the circumstances under which they worked, is very remarkable. The Ho 229 was their last and most ambitious project—yielding lessons that are still puzzling engineers.

Rocket and Jet Aircraft of the Third Reich

by Terry C. Treadwell

A popular subject these days—but this book won’t be! Too inaccurate.

Tumult in the Clouds: The Aviation Art of Russell Smith

by Jim Wilberg

Not only are 44 examples of Smith’s award-winning paintings shown and described but a dozen learned WW I specialists offer insights into airplanes, historic events, and the challenges of doing proper research.

The Lancaster and the Tirpitz

by Tony Iveson & Brian Milton

The subtitle calls only the bomber “legendary” but not the battleship? A good and necessary book but a bit one-sided.

Vought F-8 Crusader: Development of the Navy’s First Supersonic Jet Fighter

by William D. Spidle

The Navy’s first fully operational supersonic aircraft would become the most successful military aircraft ever built. This book covers its design and development as well as the early stages of its operational history.

The Spitfire: An Icon of the Skies

by Philip Kaplan

There’s a ton of Spitfire books. This one adds something. People who flew or otherwise know the Spit inside out tell you what makes this airplane different, and, well, better.