Archive for Items Categorized 'Military', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Dogfight: The Supermarine Spitfire and the Messerschmitt Bf109

by David Owen

These two very famous WW II fighters were pitted against each other for six years. Both were very good, especially under specific conditions that often favored one over the other—and both were built by men new to the fighter game.

Valkyrie: The North American XB-70

by Graham M. Simons 

70,000 ft of altitude, Mach 3, and the crew is in shirtsleeves. None of these three things are normal. This super plane took supersonic flight to the edge of the envelope. And then it died.

Flying Wings & Radical Things

by Tony Chong

You may think you know what all came out of Northrop Grumman over the years. You don’t; even if you worked there . . . This book will add a whole new list of names to drop at your next party.

Training the Right Stuff: The Aircraft That Produced America’s Jet Pilots

by Mark A. Frankel & Tommy H. Thomason

Jets behaved like nothing before them; accident rates soared. It wasn’t until 1948 that the military had a proper jet trainer—developed with private funds! This splendid book takes us from biplane to high-tech simulator.

Ilyushin Il-28

by Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov

The first mass-produced Soviet jet bomber is worth a look for many reasons, both technical and historical.

Tupolev TU-22/TU-22M

by Yefim Gordon & Sergey Komissarov

Similar names, different aircraft. One was the first Soviet supersonic nuclear-capable bomber but failed to live up to expectations, the other a completely reconfigured improvement. This book needs no improvement.

Wave-Off! A History of LSOs and Ship-Board Landings

by Robert R. “Boom” Powell

If you have even the remotest interest in flying—of any sort—or teamwork—of any sort—don’t miss this book because it’ll offer food for thought about many things!

McDonnell Douglas F-4e/EJ/F/G/RF-4E Phantom II

by JP Vieira 

A new reference book for modelers about an aircraft for which an extensive paper trail exists. Highlighted here are lesser-known and visually striking examples.

Diary of a Night Bomber Pilot in World War I

by Clive Semple

“I must now enjoy myself and not worry, otherwise I shall get nerves and that won’t do.” Far more than merely the story of a pilot, this is a glimpse of the world through the eyes of a young man with hopes, illusions, and—luck.

Spitfire In Sweden

by Mikael Forslund

How the Swedes got their Spitfires (postwar) is one of those on again/off again stories, but, given what use they were put to, it may have kept the Cold War a degree cooler.

A Complete History of U.S. Combat Aircraft Fly-Off Competitions

by Erik Simonsen

How do military aircraft make the cut to be selected for active duty? And the ones that didn’t, what would they have looked like if they had made it into service? On the latter score, this book is a winner.

The Quest for Speed

by Mike Roussel

Air racing was once a big thing, seemingly the catalyst for advancing aircraft technology and also public buy-in. By looking at only the Schneider Trophy, and from a very European point of view, this book is limited in its answers.