Archive for Items Categorized 'Biography/ Autobiography', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Isky: Ed Iskenderian and the History of Hot Rodding

by Matt Stone
The biggest names in racing were running Isky cams and Ed “the Camfather” made sure the world knew it and so became a household name. He’ still hanging around “the drags” so read the book before you run into him!

Neil “Soapy” Castles

by Henry Neil “Soapy” Castles

Living life to its fullest could be Castles’ motto. From NASCAR legend, to Hollywood insider, to taking on Exxon for groundwater contamination (a contributing factor to his cancer) and prevailing over both, Castles tells his fast-paced story.

Gustav Mesmer, Flugradbauer

by Stefan Hartmaier (editor)

A trilingual story of a German inventor/artist/poet who wants to fly—by means of a human-powered flying bicycle or strapping wings to his back. Don’t laugh. It’s a sad story. Or is it?

Simply Bev . . . “Determination is Everything”

by James H Cox

Often enough books are described as “a labor of love”—by which is meant a love for or of the subject sufficiently compelling to shoulder the burden of writing a book. Certainly this is true in this case, except that it couldn’t possibly have been a “burden” since its subject is a flesh and bones human being.

Bunty – Remembering a Gentleman of Noble Scottish-Irish Descent

by Halwart Schrader

A biography of a car dealer? Well, a legendary car dealer. Not always for the purest of reasons, though.

You’ll just have to read the book . . .

Reid Railton, Man of Speed

by Karl Ludvigsen

In its award presentation, the Royal Automobile Club called this book “magisterial.” No argument. A Railton obit referred to him as “an exceedingly capable engineer and designer.” No argument. Finally here’s a book to tell the full story.

The Legacy of Justice, An American Family Story

by Tom Madigan with Ed Justice, Jr.

“Justice Bothers” sounds like Wild West gunslingers but the Justice clan—who hail from Kansas and work out of California—are in the lubricant business. There is a rock band with that name too, and it was named after the auto guys! Just read the book.

Jim Clark – The Best of the Best

by David Tremayne

We can argue about whether Jim Clark was the greatest Grand Prix driver in history. After all, there are one or two other candidates, possibly even three or four. But we won’t disagree about whether this book is the definitive story of Scotland’s greatest driver.

Inside Marine One

by Ray L’Heureux

From building kit models to ferrying the Chief Executive of the United States, Frenchy L’Heureux’s life in aviation has put him where the front-page news took place, but behind the scenes.

Studebaker and Byers A. Burlingame

by Robert R. Ebert

As CEO, Burlingame, an erstwhile bookkeeper at Packard, was given the hard job of turning around one of the oldest names in the automotive field when the company was in deep trouble. He did, for a while.

How to Build a Car

by Adrian Newey

If only really smart people can design race-winning cars then just how smart must someone be whose designs have won over 150 Grands Prix? An unexpectedly gifted writer, Newey reveals the man behind the cliché of the geeky designer in his ivory tower.

Schlumpf

by Ard & Arnoud op de Weegh 

In the 1970s, this was the story. Greedy industrialists pilfering their corporate treasury to buy classic cars instead of paying their employees’ wages and pensions. But is that what happened? This book presents an alternative version.