Archive for Items Categorized 'Biography/ Autobiography', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Niki Lauda: The Biography

by Maurice Hamilton

One of the greatest F1 drivers of all time, he died in his sleep at age 70. He had worn many different hats in his life on and off the track, one of them to hide the scars of that near-fatal accident at a race he, then the defending world champion and points leader, considered so unsafe that he attempted to arrange a boycott.

Jim McGee, Crew Chief of Champions

by Gordon Kirby 

He cut his teeth working on a private Indy entry cobbled together in a backyard garage and rose to run some of the big-league outfits of his day. An important book about an important man.

Rudolf Uhlenhaut

by Wolfgang Scheller and Thomas Pollak 

The legendary Mercedes engineer was a hands-on wrencher and a good enough driver to embarrass professional shoes. He valued teamwork and hated blowing his own horn—which is why this is the first-ever comprehensive biography.

Frank McClean: The Godfather of British Naval Aviation

by Philip Jarrett 

Many important aviation developments wouldn’t have happened if McClean hadn’t had the means, the skills, and the convictions he possessed. At long last here’s a book to give credit where credit is due.

The Blunt End of the Grid

by Dave Roberts

Roberts’ approach to motor racing is the polar opposite to the clinical diligence of an F1 team. The best testament to this book is that if former McLaren head honcho Ron Dennis read it, he would need specialist counselling.

Drawn Out, A Seriously Funny Memoir

by Tom Scott

Comic relief . . . you know you want it. Political commentator and cartoonist, satirist, scriptwriter, playwright, raconteur, provocateur, all-round funny man. He won New Zealand Cartoonist of the Year—seven times! (Ok, it’s a small country.)

A Race with Love and Death

by Richard Williams

A young English aristocrat won the 1938 German Grand Prix—as a works driver for Mercedes-Benz, selected by Hitler himself—and became a Nazi hero! There’s plenty of drama right there, and that’s not even scratching the surface.

An English Car Designer Abroad

by Peter Birtwhistle

Recognize the cars on the cover? One man did those and many more, over the course of a 40-year career in which he saw everything—from how to shave clay to designing by committee—change.

Richie Ginther, Motor Racing’s Free Thinker

by Richard Jenkins

I hate to see anything broken” is a strong candidate for the most unlikely quotation ever attributed to a Grand Prix driver. But Richie Ginther was no ordinary driver, and no ordinary man. Here is the first-ever authorized biography.

Not Much of an Engineer, An Autobiography

by Sir Stanley Hooker

Gravely ill, this highly acclaimed aero engine engineer managed to stay alive just long enough to finish his autobiography. A modest man, he would have been embarrassed by the praise his eulogists bestowed on him.

Louis Coatalen

by Oliver Standerwick Heal 

A portrait of charm and wit, and an “eye on the prize” sort of determination that could be quite ruthless. You may not know the name but you use stuff that has his fingerprints on it even if you don’t realize it. Someone spent twenty years writing this book—read it!

Harold Edgerton: Seeing the Unseen

by Ron Kurtz, Deborah Douglas, Gus Kayafas (editors)

Thanks to the use of strobes and flashes, Edgerton’s Speedray photos, as they were nicknamed, gave visual evidence of laws of nature that had only been theorized upon before but not been observable. This book offers a look at the science and the man.