Archive for Items Categorized 'Biography/ Autobiography', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

I Kept No Diary

by F.R.(Rod) Banks

If your motor requires high octane fuel it probably has high compression. Banks is the man who championed this technology—and a thousand other things—which is probably why he had no time to keep a diary. He was 80 when he wrote this book, and still working!

Brian Redman – Daring Drivers, Deadly Tracks

by Brian Redman, Jim Mullen

A really good biography of a great racer and a hugely decent man who survived his pro years—often barely—with enough good cheer to retire at age 52 and still remain active in historic racing.

Fly and Deliver, A Ferry Pilot’s Log Book

by Hugh Bergel

Ferry pilots deliver planes—military, civilian, private. It’s an interesting career or sideline, even today, and a great way to build flight time and get your hands on the controls of many different types.

Betrayed: Secrecy, Lies, and Consequences

by Frederic H. Martini

Being a POW is hard enough. Not being believed afterwards, and even being denied disability benefits is worse. Having someone who knew of your plight but didn’t help be hailed as a hero is . . . well . . . this book will make you question who the good guys are.

A Life in Car Design – Jaguar, Lotus, TVR

by Oliver Winterbottom

After a half century of design—and not only cars—there are stories to tell, insights to share, and a new generation to motivate. You may have never heard of Winterbottom but this book delivers.

Portrait in Oil, The Autobiography of Nubar Gulbenkian

by Nubar S. Gulbenkian

Eccentric and rich beyond measure, this Armenian business magnate and international playboy cut a large figure in life and even in death. An insightful and entertaining portrait of one of the key figures involved in the international oil trade beginning before the First World War.

Frank McClean: The Godfather of British Naval Aviation

by Philip Jarrett 

Many important aviation developments wouldn’t have happened if McClean hadn’t had the means, the skills, and the convictions he possessed. At long last here’s a book to give credit where credit is due.

Conversations with Bruñuel

by Max Aub

Bruñuel was known to take liberties in the telling of his life and deeds but the author kept him on the straight and narrow. His avant-garde films are difficult to parse and take effort. So does this book.

Forghieri on Ferrari: 1947 to the Present

by Mauro Forghieri & Daniele Buzzonetti

The youngest, the longest-serving, and the most successful Ferrari engineer to date speaks candidly of his life working on some of the most iconic sports and racing cars. A long-overdue and much-needed book.

Lady Lucy Houston DBE, Aviation Champion and Mother of the Spitfire

by Miles Macnair

Picture this: an air force is fighting for its very survival. A private citizen offers to buy her impoverished government several squadrons of fighter planes. The government says—no. This snub kickstarted a chain of events that culminated in Britain developing one of the important aircraft of all time.

Mad for Speed,
 The Racing Life of Joan Newton Cuneo



by Elsa A. Nystrom

Possessed of a strong work ethic, social graces and society connections, and unafraid of the new, Cuneo blazed a trail—and also got her fingers burned. Too little has been remembered of her life but now this fine biography shows us what we missed.

When Rolls and Royce Made History on Dover’s White Cliffs

by Paul Tritton

This small book adds useful detail to a lesser-known chapter of the history of not only the two cofounders of Rolls-Royce but two other important men in the firm’s, and Britain’s history.