Archive for Items Categorized 'History', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The Kellner Affair: Matters of Life and Death

by Larsen and Erickson

The raison d’être for this book is that French coachbuilder J.P. Kellner was executed by the Nazis as a spy, a victim, as were others, of denunciation. This monumental book examines original documents, all reproduced here—and concludes/proves that the guy blamed for it is not the guy! Oh, and there are cars too . . .

Roadside Relics: America’s Abandoned Automobiles

by Will Shiers

This look at scrapped American cars lain to rest in field and stream (yes, literally) not only documents relics of yesteryear but also a phenomenon that won’t exist much longer.

Postcards of the Army Service Corps 1902–1918: Coming of Age

by Michael Young

From eggs to ammo, the Army Service Corps kept front-line troops fighting. This book presents hundreds of postcards showing what the daily grind was like, and from locales to fashion, it gives anyone with an interest in things historical something to relate to.

Russian Warships in the Age of Sail 1696–1860

Design, Construction, Careers and Fates 

by Tredrea & Sozaev

Britannia may have ruled the waves although at the time Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson wrote his poem Rule, Britannia! in 1740 it was meant as an exhortation, something to aspire to, not a statement of fact.

How to be a Good Motorist

by Harold Pemberton

Written in the 1920s this little book seeks to brief new drivers on road etiquette and basic knowledge about owning and operating a motorcar.

Betrayed: Secrecy, Lies, and Consequences

by Frederic H. Martini

Being a POW is hard enough. Not being believed afterwards, and even being denied disability benefits is worse. Having someone who knew of your plight but didn’t help be hailed as a hero is . . . well . . . this book will make you question who the good guys are.

Military Aviation Disasters: Significant Losses Since 1908

by David B.Gero

Whereas the Geneva-based Aircraft Crashes Record Office compiles and makes public statistics on aviation accidents of aircraft capable of carrying more than six passengers (excluding helicopters, balloons, and fighter airplanes), the military keeps its cards closer to the vest.

Sports Car Racing in Camera 1950–59

by Paul Parker

This is now the third In Camera book about sports cars by this author and this publisher. As the title would suggest, it is the photographs that are at the core of this series. Readers who already know any of the other books will have high expectations, which will not be disappointed here.

Ask the Man Who Owns One: An Illustrated History of Packard Advertising

by Arthur W. Einstein Jr.

Even if this book were only about the advertising, as the subtitle suggests, it would be a most interesting addition to the literature because in terms of esthetics and message Packard’s advertising was no less distinctive than its cars and is certainly worthy of an in-depth look.

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

The American Motorcycle Girls

by Cristine Sommer Simmons

Few things are more satisfying to the serious reader than to come across a book that boldly goes where none has gone before. Well and insightfully written, fantastically illustrated, designed with period touches—and not to forget, a really decent price!

Once In a Great City, A Detroit Story

by David Maraniss

Greatness comes before the fall, and Detroit was once great. You’ll wish you’d had the chance to experience it yourself but until it becomes great again, this book will have to suffice.