Archive for Items Categorized 'History', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

The Coventry Motor Industry: Birth to Renaissance

by David Thoms & Tom Donnelly

Coventry is synonymous with both the creation and relative decline of the British motorcar industry. This text explores the relationship between the car industry in its local context, and the wider economic, social and political environment.

Lotus Esprit, The Official Story

by Jeremy Walton

The Lotus Esprit may have held a record among British sports cars for continuous production—28 years and almost 11,000 copies sold—but pick up an automotive encyclopedia today and you’ll find that this Lotus hardly warrants a footnote.

Zagato Milano 1919–2009, The Official Book

This book does not come right out and say what it is. Neither do the press release or the advertising copy. If you know of Nada’s other Zagato books you would assume this new one to be along the lines of those others. It isn’t.

The Berlin Airlift: The World’s Largest Ever Air Supply Operation 

by John Grehan

The enormity of this 1948/49 operation cannot ever be overstated. This tiny book seems an unlikely candidate for doing it justice, but it does. Exceptional!

Born to Be Wild

by Randy D. McBee

Bikers—menace to society or upstanding citizens? Want to look at motorcycling from a scholarly point of view? If class, race, gender, sexual orientation, stereotypes, and politics interest you as much as cubic inches and spark plug gaps, this is the book.

Inside Marine One

by Ray L’Heureux

From building kit models to ferrying the Chief Executive of the United States, Frenchy L’Heureux’s life in aviation has put him where the front-page news took place, but behind the scenes.

The Kellner Affair: Matters of Life and Death

by Larsen and Erickson

The raison d’être for this book is that French coachbuilder J.P. Kellner was executed by the Nazis as a spy, a victim, as were others, of denunciation. This monumental book examines original documents, all reproduced here—and concludes/proves that the guy blamed for it is not the guy! Oh, and there are cars too . . .

Roadside Relics: America’s Abandoned Automobiles

by Will Shiers

This look at scrapped American cars lain to rest in field and stream (yes, literally) not only documents relics of yesteryear but also a phenomenon that won’t exist much longer.

Postcards of the Army Service Corps 1902–1918: Coming of Age

by Michael Young

From eggs to ammo, the Army Service Corps kept front-line troops fighting. This book presents hundreds of postcards showing what the daily grind was like, and from locales to fashion, it gives anyone with an interest in things historical something to relate to.

Russian Warships in the Age of Sail 1696–1860

Design, Construction, Careers and Fates 

by Tredrea & Sozaev

Britannia may have ruled the waves although at the time Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson wrote his poem Rule, Britannia! in 1740 it was meant as an exhortation, something to aspire to, not a statement of fact.

How to be a Good Motorist

by Harold Pemberton

Written in the 1920s this little book seeks to brief new drivers on road etiquette and basic knowledge about owning and operating a motorcar.