Archive for Items Categorized 'Multilingual / Not English', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Deutscher Automobil-Rennsport 1946–1955

by Reinald Schumann

Zero-Hour means the immediate postwar years, the years in which war-ravaged Germany clawed its way back into the civilized—and mechanized—world. A-racing we must go!

Probably the most thorough book to date, with hundreds of photos, many of which new to the record.

Details – Legendary Sports Cars Up Close: 1965–1969

by Wilfried Müller

“Up close” means just that—views from angles or in settings you don’t often see in books. And for American readers many of the 60 cars shown here will be outliers they’ve probably not seen in real life anyway.

Werner Eisele: Motor Racing Photography

by Werner Eisele

Don’t even take the time to read the review—order the book first before someone else does. There are only 3500 copies of this homage to the photographer’s friends in the racing world.

Gustav Mesmer, Flugradbauer

by Stefan Hartmaier (editor)

A trilingual story of a German inventor/artist/poet who wants to fly—by means of a human-powered flying bicycle or strapping wings to his back. Don’t laugh. It’s a sad story. Or is it?

Mille Miglia, 1000 Miles of Passion

40 towns in 48 hours. Anyone with the right car and about €8500 can apply. Take a look at the 2014 event to see if this is for you.

Ikarus: Busse für die Welt

by Christian Suhr

If you like busses, you’ll want to know about Ikarus from Hungary and this is about the only book to do the job. From China to Canada, you may have ridden in one and not even known it!

The Watch Book

by Gisbert L. Brunner & Christian Pfeiffer-Belli

Sure, smartphones tell time—but that’s not what the engineering marvels and artworks that are the mechanical wristwatch are about. This book showcases 18 makers and highlights of their work.

OAL- BB 50

by Paolo Tumminelli (editor)

Having been closely associated for half a century, Alpina and BMW are almost synonymous. This book is a lighthearted but entirely substantive look at what really puts the “ultimate” into The Ultimate Driving Machine.

Monzanapolis, The Monza 500 Miles

by Aldo Zana

Primarily about the 1957–58 Race of Two Worlds this well-researched book sheds light on a relatively unexplored subject, the multitude of American/ European face-offs that began with the Vanderbilt Cup of 1905.

Auto-Mobilität – Wie der Mensch das Laufen verlernte

by Roland Löwisch

The history of the car and all the various bits that made it possible, from the taming of fire to the taming of animals to the invention of the wheel.

A formidable, illustrated reference book you’ll be picking up again and again. Even if you don’t speak German!

Monteverdi: Geschichte einer Schweizer Automarke

by Gloor and Wagner

This small Swiss marque was created by an outstanding man with great vision who rose from car salesman to racer to F1 team boss, considered gasoline his drug, and owned 11,000 model cars. How could you not be interested? This is the only book about him and his cars.

Mercedes-Benz – The Grand Cabrios & Coupés

by René Staud (photos), Jürgen Lewandowski (text)

Who needs coupés and cabrios is what this book asks. Unless the answer is self-evident in these photos you’ll have to come up with your own.