Archive for Items Categorized 'Other Genres', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

That Thin, Wild Mercury Sound

by Daryl Sanders

Bob Dylan’s first album was released in 1962. Since then he has recorded over three dozen studio albums. He is still actively recording and performing. With all that material, it would be difficult to pick a favorite, but there seems to be a general agreement that his 1966 Blonde On Blonde is the best of the best. Sander’s book tells a very detailed, very lively tale of its making.

The Aircraft-Spotter’s Film and Television Companion

by Simon D. Beck

An indispensable companion when you watch a movie and wonder “What was that??” The book tells you that, and more: who flew it, who built it, where is it, was it real?

Steve McQueen: Le Mans in the Rearview Mirror

by Donald Nunley

A prop master on a movie sees a lot. This book is written by one, and he sure did see a lot. It seems it took him years to get over it. If you can’t decide whether you love or hate the movie, this book will at least explain why it all went so very wrong.

Behind Le Mans – The Film In Photographs

by Michael Keyser

It’s almost 50 years ago that this movie was made. It was not a box office hit but—and this is the only thing that mattered to the one person who needed to make it, Steve McQueen—it was true to racing, life and death, few words and big deeds.

The International Harvester Company

by Chaim M. Rosenberg

And you thought farm equipment is boring…! Well, it may be, to some, but this book isn’t about the machinery but the machinations of the people at the helm of one of America’s biggest firms.

3-D Movies

by R.M. Hayes

The “hyperhaptic visuality” in Avatar in 2009 may have created a lot of hoopla—only to then fizz out again—but the 3D film process was already over a hundred years old by then! From specific movies to how they’re made and on what equipment, this book by an industry insider is a good overview.

A Grand Complication

by Stacy Perman

This gripping social commentary and fine character study pins two men against each other who yearn to add the most complicated watch ever to their collections.

Superman, The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero

by Larry Tye

Little Orphan Annie and Oliver Twist have more in common with the Man of Steel than you might think and this is only of many surprising connections this book makes.

Decoding Dylan

by Jim Curtis

The most elusive, enigmatic, inscrutable and problematic songwriter of the Rock era—is it really possible to decode Bob Dylan’s songs? Is Jim Curtis, an academic, up to the task? Read our review and decide for yourself. Decoding Dylan is like untangling a closet full of clothes hangers.

Want To Hold Your Hand / This Boy

The Beatles

All right, so it’s a record.. . . There’s more to life than car books, dontchaknow, and we are, after all, inquisitive folk. So read this. Or don’t.

Building the Star of India

by David M. Cox

Would you be able to tell from the cover photo that this is a 22″-long model?? With thousands of parts, many fully functional? You do have to be a rocket scientist to build these things—or you have to know the fellow who wrote this book and can build yours.

Space Odyssey

by Michael Benson

The movie is still fantastic. It has aged very, very well. Michael Benson tells the story of its conception, gestation and birth. He did his job so well that our reviewer was too involved and engrossed to actually write a proper review, but, please, check out his attempt . . .