Archive for Items Categorized 'Other Genres', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford

by Beth Tompkins Bates

Built it and they will come. Henry Ford did a lot more than rethink the assembly line or the $5 workday. He hired African Americans and they left the South and came by the tens of thousands. What did each expect of the other?

Red Tape and White Knuckles: One Woman’s Motorcycle Adventure through Africa

by Lois Pryce

No fancy bike, no fancy gear, no fancy Adventure Tours outfit—just one woman and her little Yamaha taking on the Dark Continent. Sadly, no fancy photographs either—you’ll have to use your imagination.

Racer

by John Andretti & Jade Gurss

You wouldn’t know from just the book title that this story does not have a good ending, at least not in the conventional sense. Good will surely come from reading it and one would like to think that good came to the man who had the courage to write it.

Lessons in Imperial Rule

by Andrew Skeen

Sounds like “ancient history” but while it doesn’t have application today, it has implications that are still relevant in a world of terror and guerilla fighting.

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design

by Chris Lefteri

The world as you know it is not quite as you know it—the finished products you handle every day are full of surprises as to how they’re made.

Tootsie Toys, World’s First Diecast Models

by James Wieland and Edward Force

“America’s Oldest Toy Company” started in the 1890s and is still around—making about 40 million items a year! And it all began in the laundry trade. This little book is a nifty survey.

The First World War: Unseen Glass Plate Photographs of the Western Front

by Carl De Keyzer and David Van Reybrouck

Whether you’re a student of history or photography this book has new things to say and show—none of them simple or simplistic but all wrenching and necessary.

Our Le Mans, The Movie – The Friendship – The Facts

by Hans Hamer, editor

That movie destroyed friendships and budgets and schedules. It probably didn’t help anyone’s career. And there’s also a less talked-about side to it, recorded just in time before its author died.

We Speak from the Air, WW2 Broadcasts from the RAF

by the Ministry of Information

Read this alongside some of Winston Churchill’s speeches and there won’t be a dry eye in the house. The over 1000 RAF and WAAF personnel that made these wartime broadcasts remained anonymous but the highly personal pictures they paint cut to the bone.

That Thin, Wild Mercury Sound

by Daryl Sanders

Bob Dylan’s first album was released in 1962. Since then he has recorded over three dozen studio albums. He is still actively recording and performing. With all that material, it would be difficult to pick a favorite, but there seems to be a general agreement that his 1966 Blonde On Blonde is the best of the best. Sander’s book tells a very detailed, very lively tale of its making.

The Aircraft-Spotter’s Film and Television Companion

by Simon D. Beck

An indispensable companion when you watch a movie and wonder “What was that??” The book tells you that, and more: who flew it, who built it, where is it, was it real?

Steve McQueen: Le Mans in the Rearview Mirror

by Donald Nunley

A prop master on a movie sees a lot. This book is written by one, and he sure did see a lot. It seems it took him years to get over it. If you can’t decide whether you love or hate the movie, this book will at least explain why it all went so very wrong.