Archive for Items Categorized 'Racing, Rally', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The World’s Fastest E-Type Jaguar, The Quest for the Record

by Phil Shephard

That a 50-year-old E-Type set a record on the ice, twice, actually, is surprising enough. So is the story of its amateur crew coping with small budgets and many a deprivation.

Porsche 917: The Undercover Story

by Gordon Wingrove

There is no shortage of interesting books about this iconic racecar. What makes this one stand out is that it is written by a former race mechanic who knows every nut and bolt on the car.

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

Sports Car Racing in Camera 1950–59

by Paul Parker

This is now the third In Camera book about sports cars by this author and this publisher. As the title would suggest, it is the photographs that are at the core of this series. Readers who already know any of the other books will have high expectations, which will not be disappointed here.

What Doesn’t Kill You . . . My Life in Motor Racing

by Johnny Herbert

Today this gifted all-round driver is praised for an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of his sport on his broadcasts for Britain’s Sky Sports F1 channel but this autobiography skips over a few bits in the name of telling a grander story.

1967: Chris Amon, Scuderia Ferrari and a Year of Living Dangerously

by John Julian

The young New Zealander is not exactly a household name—except among knowledgeable racing enthusiasts. From technical to social aspects, the book describes many aspects of a particularly storied year in racing history.

Ian Walker Racing: The Man and His Cars

by Julian Balme

From amateur rally driver to team owner who supplied rides in which world championships were won, Walker was a force to be reckoned with in the 1950s and ‘60s. This fine bio is the first, and the world would be just fine if it remained the only one.

Motorsports and American Culture

by Mark D. Howell & John D. Miller (eds)

Are motorsports relevant to the culture at large? Essays from a diverse range of contributors look for answers from the late nineteenth century to the present—but other cultures may well have different answers.

Bud Moore’s Right Hand Man: A NASCAR Team Manager’s Career at Full Throttle

by Greg Moore with Perry Allen Wood

A look at NASCAR from the inside. Watching it on TV or even live gives you little insight into what goes on on the other side of pit wall—not always pretty and never simple.

Silverstone – the Home of British Motor Racing

by Chas Parker

First used in 1947 by a bunch of friends for some off-the-cuff racing—running over a sheep in the pursuit of speed—this former airfield drew only a year later a crowd of 100,000 for its first proper British GP. Here is the whole story, from then to 2013.

Bonneville: A Century of Speed

by David Fetherston and Ron Main

The mythic salt flats have played an important role in motorsports for over a hundred years. This book is meant to celebrate and promote it, and back up the myth with hard data but, much like the salt itself, it has difficulties yielding a smooth, straight run.

Schlegelmilch Sportscar Racing 1962–1973

by David Tremayne

An important photographer, an important period, expect to be entertained and delighted and moved the way only images can do.