Archive for Items Categorized 'Racing, Rally', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

I Love to Make the DIRT FLY!

by Carl Hungness

Who was the man who “Created A Great City From A Jungle”? A serial entrepreneur who started a bicycle business, created multi-million dollar enterprises, and dreamt up the Indy 500.

Mille Miglia, 1000 Miles of Passion

40 towns in 48 hours. Anyone with the right car and about €8500 can apply. Take a look at the 2014 event to see if this is for you.

Lime Rock Park

This natural-terrain road racing venue is the oldest continuously operating track in the US and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Two good books, 30 years apart, explain its appeal—and how banning racing on Sundays can be a good thing.

One Off: The Roads, The Races, The Automobiles of Toly Arutunoff

by Anatoly A. Arutunoff

The story of a supremely colorful life—that’s still going on, full bore. Well, almost. If you know anything about the beginnings of club racing in the US, this is a name you know—or should know.

Classic Grand Prix Cars

by Karl Ludvigsen

Why and how—and when—did F1 shift from front- to rear-engined racers? Back in print now this book offers the sort of in-depth analysis that has made Ludvigsen’s name.

Second to One: All But For Indy

by Gordon Kirby & Joseph Freeman

Winning the Indy 500 makes you a household name. Well, in some households. For a while. The ones who don’t win, no matter how long the list of their accomplishments here or elsewhere, get no love. Here’s their story.

The Argentine Temporada Motor Races 1950 to 1960

by Hernan Lopez Laiseca

Fabulous photos, many new to the record, document a formative—and very dangerous—period in a corner of the world in which few people had a driver’s license but were all mad for racing.

Bud Moore’s Right Hand Man: A NASCAR Team Manager’s Career at Full Throttle

by Greg Moore with Perry Allen Wood

A look at NASCAR from the inside. Watching it on TV or even live gives you little insight into what goes on on the other side of pit wall—not always pretty and never simple.

MotorBinder: Classic Photographs from the Golden Age of Motor Racing

by Roy Spencer

Not just another catch-all generic photo book! This is a story, told in period photos, of mostly west coast racing seen from the perspective of someone who participated fielding his own cars and for-hire drivers.

Monzanapolis, The Monza 500 Miles

by Aldo Zana

Primarily about the 1957–58 Race of Two Worlds this well-researched book sheds light on a relatively unexplored subject, the multitude of American/ European face-offs that began with the Vanderbilt Cup of 1905.

Auto Racing Comes of Age

by Robert Dick

It is nothing short of amazing that the transition from rickety horseless carriage you could outrun on foot to fire-snorting record-breaking racecar took so little time. This excellent book examines the European and American history of the origins of motorsports.

Brian Redman – Daring Drivers, Deadly Tracks

by Brian Redman, Jim Mullen

A really good biography of a great racer and a hugely decent man who survived his pro years—often barely—with enough good cheer to retire at age 52 and still remain active in historic racing.