Archive for Items Categorized 'Racing, Rally', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Classic Grand Prix Cars

by Karl Ludvigsen

Why and how—and when—did F1 shift from front- to rear-engined racers? Back in print now this book offers the sort of in-depth analysis that has made Ludvigsen’s name.

Second to One: All But For Indy

by Gordon Kirby & Joseph Freeman

Winning the Indy 500 makes you a household name. Well, in some households. For a while. The ones who don’t win, no matter how long the list of their accomplishments here or elsewhere, get no love. Here’s their story.

The Argentine Temporada Motor Races 1950 to 1960

by Hernan Lopez Laiseca

Fabulous photos, many new to the record, document a formative—and very dangerous—period in a corner of the world in which few people had a driver’s license but were all mad for racing.

Bud Moore’s Right Hand Man: A NASCAR Team Manager’s Career at Full Throttle

by Greg Moore with Perry Allen Wood

A look at NASCAR from the inside. Watching it on TV or even live gives you little insight into what goes on on the other side of pit wall—not always pretty and never simple.

MotorBinder: Classic Photographs from the Golden Age of Motor Racing

by Roy Spencer

Not just another catch-all generic photo book! This is a story, told in period photos, of mostly west coast racing seen from the perspective of someone who participated fielding his own cars and for-hire drivers.

Monzanapolis, The Monza 500 Miles

by Aldo Zana

Primarily about the 1957–58 Race of Two Worlds this well-researched book sheds light on a relatively unexplored subject, the multitude of American/ European face-offs that began with the Vanderbilt Cup of 1905.

Auto Racing Comes of Age

by Robert Dick

It is nothing short of amazing that the transition from rickety horseless carriage you could outrun on foot to fire-snorting record-breaking racecar took so little time. This excellent book examines the European and American history of the origins of motorsports.

Brian Redman – Daring Drivers, Deadly Tracks

by Brian Redman, Jim Mullen

A really good biography of a great racer and a hugely decent man who survived his pro years—often barely—with enough good cheer to retire at age 52 and still remain active in historic racing.

Bonneville: A Century of Speed

by David Fetherston and Ron Main

The mythic salt flats have played an important role in motorsports for over a hundred years. This book is meant to celebrate and promote it, and back up the myth with hard data but, much like the salt itself, it has difficulties yielding a smooth, straight run.

The Rise and Fall of the French Alpine Rally

by Martin Pfundner

How better to shake out cars—and impress the buying public—than by flogging them up and down hairy mountain passes. The French took their time embracing it but once they did, they stuck with it. Finally, here’s a proper book in English.

City of Speed: Los Angeles and the Rise of American Racing

by Joe Scalzo

Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but fact and the correct application thereof is not. The subject matter makes sense, the author is known. All should be well. This 2007 book was lauded by everyone; we beg to differ.

Powered by Porsche, The Alternative Race Cars

by Roy Smith

“Everyone” knows that Porsche makes serious race cars—but even Porsche geeks will surely not know just how many other makes and teams used Porsche motors and know-how to better their own fortunes, often enough in competition against the provider.