Archive for Items Categorized 'Racing, Rally', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

A Race with Love and Death

by Richard Williams

A young English aristocrat won the 1938 German Grand Prix—as a works driver for Mercedes-Benz, selected by Hitler himself—and became a Nazi hero! There’s plenty of drama right there, and that’s not even scratching the surface.

John, George and the HWMs

by Simon Taylor

Underdogs. Two mechanical engineers, one of whom practically a household name as a quite good race driver, stood up a race team—because they could and because no one else was. They did well, but ask people today about “HWM” . . .

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

Richie Ginther, Motor Racing’s Free Thinker

by Richard Jenkins

I hate to see anything broken” is a strong candidate for the most unlikely quotation ever attributed to a Grand Prix driver. But Richie Ginther was no ordinary driver, and no ordinary man. Here is the first-ever authorized biography.

Faster

by Neal Bascomb

If this weren’t a true story it would make a gripping novel. Hitler’s state-sponsored racing effort is hardly a new topic, nor is the episode related here, but Bascomb has done his own, fresh research and presents it well.

Taking the World by Storm

by Malcolm Cracknell

A rollercoaster ride of a book about what might have happened in an alternative history of the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1997.

Ferrari 333 SP, A Pictorial History 1993–2003

by Terry O’Neil

The most successful Ferrari ever run in Prototype racing was only ever campaigned by privateers. And only 40 were built. Of which only 27 raced. Why are there no serious books about this?? Well, now there is.

Twice Around the Clock, The Yanks at Le Mans

by Tim Considine

A quarter century of research and interviews has gone into these three books—and four more are to come. Lots of untold personal stories of people who were there, lots of new photos.

Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo, Porsche 1952–1982

by Patrick Dasse & Maurice Louche

More photo album than rally analysis, these books will suck you in! Cars, people, interesting locations—and buckets o’ snow. Obviously all seen through Porsche-colored glasses.

Crash! From Senna To Earnhardt

by Jonathan Ingram

Did auto racing’s first head and neck restraint save an entire sport? The short answer is no. The long answer is—this book. In the week after Earnhardt’s crash, HANS Performance Products took more orders for its device than in the previous 10 years.

The Ford that Beat Ferrari: A Racing History of the GT40

by John S. Allen and Gordon J. Jones 

Seen the movie? (Do!) Now read the book—or, rather, re-read this 34-year-old classic now in its 3rd and yet again improved edition.

Jaguar E-Type Factory and Private Competition Cars

by Peter Griffiths

Wait, the sexy “crumpet-catcher” was a serious race car? Campaigned by regular people? To this day? Yes, yes, and yes. And finally there’s a book about all of them, not just the Lightweights!