Archive for Items Categorized 'Racing, Rally', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Powered by Porsche, The Alternative Race Cars

by Roy Smith

“Everyone” knows that Porsche makes serious race cars—but even Porsche geeks will surely not know just how many other makes and teams used Porsche motors and know-how to better their own fortunes, often enough in competition against the provider.

Niki Lauda: The Biography

by Maurice Hamilton

One of the greatest F1 drivers of all time, he died in his sleep at age 70. He had worn many different hats in his life on and off the track, one of them to hide the scars of that near-fatal accident at a race he, then the defending world champion and points leader, considered so unsafe that he attempted to arrange a boycott.

Jim McGee, Crew Chief of Champions

by Gordon Kirby 

He cut his teeth working on a private Indy entry cobbled together in a backyard garage and rose to run some of the big-league outfits of his day. An important book about an important man.

Brooklands, The Sports Car Endurance Races

by David Blumlein

Who’d have thunk that this category of Brooklands racing had never before been fully written up? This small book is remarkable in every way.

The Blunt End of the Grid

by Dave Roberts

Roberts’ approach to motor racing is the polar opposite to the clinical diligence of an F1 team. The best testament to this book is that if former McLaren head honcho Ron Dennis read it, he would need specialist counselling.

Mille Miglia 1957: Last Act in a Legendary Race

by Carlo Dolcini

That fateful, tragic race in which de Portago and his co-driver drove to their deaths. Knowingly, if you follow the author’s way of presenting it. The chain of events that led to it is told here in the context of all the teams and their playbooks.

A Race with Love and Death

by Richard Williams

A young English aristocrat won the 1938 German Grand Prix—as a works driver for Mercedes-Benz, selected by Hitler himself—and became a Nazi hero! There’s plenty of drama right there, and that’s not even scratching the surface.

John, George and the HWMs

by Simon Taylor

Underdogs. Two mechanical engineers, one of whom practically a household name as a quite good race driver, stood up a race team—because they could and because no one else was. They did well, but ask people today about “HWM” . . .

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

Richie Ginther, Motor Racing’s Free Thinker

by Richard Jenkins

I hate to see anything broken” is a strong candidate for the most unlikely quotation ever attributed to a Grand Prix driver. But Richie Ginther was no ordinary driver, and no ordinary man. Here is the first-ever authorized biography.

Faster

by Neal Bascomb

If this weren’t a true story it would make a gripping novel. Hitler’s state-sponsored racing effort is hardly a new topic, nor is the episode related here, but Bascomb has done his own, fresh research and presents it well.

Taking the World by Storm

by Malcolm Cracknell

A rollercoaster ride of a book about what might have happened in an alternative history of the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1997.