Taking the World by Storm

by Malcolm Cracknell

A rollercoaster ride of a book about what might have happened in an alternative history of the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1997.

Conquest of the Skies

by William Wolf

You’ve heard it a hundred times: the Wright brothers’ first flight was shorter than the wingspan of a Boeing 747 built only 60 years later. How this was achieved is the question this book examines.

Women Who Ride the Hoka Hey

by Abagail Van Vlerah

Picture it: the first Challenge went from Florida to Alaska, more than 8500 back road miles! Over 190 hours in the saddle. And you have to sleep outside! Things have changed since then—“Hóka-héy!” (Let’s Go! in the Lakota language) indeed.

Ferrari 333 SP, A Pictorial History 1993–2003

by Terry O’Neil

The most successful Ferrari ever run in Prototype racing was only ever campaigned by privateers. And only 40 were built. Of which only 27 raced. Why are there no serious books about this?? Well, now there is.

Buckminster Fuller: Dymaxion Car

by Jonathan Glancey, Norman Foster

Fuller built three Dymaxions, not so much to build cars but to explore a concept he applied to pretty much everything in life. British architect Norman Foster built a fourth, for a 2010 exhibition in Spain, and this book tells the story of all four.

Dornier Do X: The Story of Claude Dornier’s Legendary Flying Boat

by Volker A. Behr

It was the biggest aircraft of its day but only three were built. It took twelve years to design—and less than half that time to withdraw them from service. What happened?

American Light Trucks & Utility Vehicles, 1967 to 1989

by J “Kelly” Flory Jr

In an age in which Ford’s F-Series has been the best-selling pickup truck in the US since 1977 it’s easy to lose sight of what else was/is out there. Whether it’s to settle a bet, check a fact, or just get lost in the cars and trucks of yesteryear, Flory’s books are unsurpassed for detail and accuracy.

Alfa Romeo Arese

by Patrick Dasse

An Arese is not an Alfa model but the place where they were made, and this book contains hundreds of archival photos from AR about it.

Coachwork on Rolls-Royce and Bentley 1945–1965

by James Taylor

The period covered by this bookmarks the transition from custom to increasingly standardized bodies, and not even ultra luxury marques were spared. This book looks at both types, highlighting the output of 56 British and Continental firms.

Twice Around the Clock, The Yanks at Le Mans

by Tim Considine

A quarter century of research and interviews has gone into these three books—and four more are to come. Lots of untold personal stories of people who were there, lots of new photos.

Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo, Porsche 1952–1982

by Patrick Dasse & Maurice Louche

More photo album than rally analysis, these books will suck you in! Cars, people, interesting locations—and buckets o’ snow. Obviously all seen through Porsche-colored glasses.

Crash! From Senna To Earnhardt

by Jonathan Ingram

Did auto racing’s first head and neck restraint save an entire sport? The short answer is no. The long answer is—this book. In the week after Earnhardt’s crash, HANS Performance Products took more orders for its device than in the previous 10 years.