Search Result for 'Indianapolis', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

City of Speed: Los Angeles and the Rise of American Racing

by Joe Scalzo

Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but fact and the correct application thereof is not. The subject matter makes sense, the author is known. All should be well. This 2007 book was lauded by everyone; we beg to differ.

Mercer Magic

by Clifford W. Zink

Worth millions today, these high-performance cars were built by the heir to a bridge-building dynasty who died tragically on the Titanic. But wait, there’s more, a lot more. And it’s all here in the first complete history of the Mercer automobile.

1 1/2-litre Grand Prix Racing 1961–65 – Low Power, High Tech

by Mark Whitelock

Period photos, cutaway drawings, racing stats and venues, drivers and teams—all put together by someone who paid attention at the time only to grow disappointed by later forms of GP racing. This book is his sympathetic reappraisal of a complicated era.

The Amazing Life of John Cooper Fitch

by Art Evans

“Amazing” doesn’t even begin to exhaust the fullness of the man whose obit described him as “bathed in golden sunlight.” Pilot, racer, sailor, inventor, family man, holder of a speed record—for driving backward.

World Championship

by Gregor J. Grant

The author of the iconic The Boy’s Book of Motor Sport also had his adult audience covered, with books and a weekly magazine that followed motor racing in a serious, data-intensive way.

Cooper Cars

by Doug Nye

If all you associate with the name is Mini Coopers let yourself be enlightened by this benchmark book about a hole-in-the wall racing shop that diced with the big boys.

Autocourse 2016–2017

by Tony Dodgins, editor

The joys—and burdens—of wanting/needing to buy an annual motorsports book. Once you start, you really cannot sit out a year, can you?

The Indy Car Wars

by Sigur E. Whitaker

As motorsports go, Indy racing draws the most eyeballs in the US but the sport’s troubled history remains a polarizing topic. This book takes a stab at unraveling the complicated and often unsavory backstory.

1964 Watson Sheraton Thompson Special

by Donald Davidson, photos by Peter Harholdt

The actual car survives to this day, exactly as it finished its dominant 1964 season which included an Indy win. A short book but expertly written and photographed.

Two Summers: The Mercedes-Benz W 196 R Racing Car

by Robert Ackerson

Drawn largely from period reports and material published by the principals this book describes the 12 races in which this important car ran, thereby giving a good flavor of high-level GP racing in the 1950s.

The Restoration of Antique and Classic Cars, Vol. 1

by Richard C. Wheatley & Brian Morgan

A classic in the 1960s, this practical how-to book outlines critical steps and considerations. They may not apply the same way today but the book will bring back fond memories to the legions whose copies have long worn out.

First Principles: The Official Biography of Keith Duckworth OBE

by Norman Burr

He was behind the most successful engines in racing history, and his company, Cosworth, became a major player. He had the complex personality that seems inseparable from such overachievement, and this book, at last, tells the story.