Search Result for 'Indianapolis', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Hello, I’m Paul Page: “It’s Race Day in Indianapolis”

by Paul Page & J.R. Elrod

Could auto racing reporting be Emmy-worthy? You bet—Page did it twice! He probably could have brought excitement to reading the telephone directory out loud. From the X Games to hot dog eating contests, this memoir covers six decades in the broadcast booth.

Tony Hulman: The Man Who Saved the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

by Sigur E. Whitaker

From wholesale grocer to motorsports impresario this unknown businessman would become a household name. This biography presents these and many other of his activities.

The British at Indianapolis

by Ian Wagstaff

The race that bills itself as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” turned 100 in 2011. This book celebrates the British contribution to the race, not just the drivers but the mechanics, engineers, designers, and even officials.

James Allison: A Biography of the Engine Manufacturer and Indianapolis 500 Cofounder

by Sigur E Whitaker

You know rearview mirrors, four-wheel brakes, front-wheel drive, and maybe even balloon tires. But do you know that all these things, and many more, can be traced back to one of the businesses that sprang from the fertile mind of James Allison (1872–1928)?

Lost In Time – Formula 5000 in North America

by John Zimmermann

Even right now, today, Formula 1 is asking itself if there really is an audience for open-wheel single seaters in the US. The F5000 managers in the 1970s thought not and pulled the plug on an otherwise fully functioning racing series. By now, some people may have forgotten it ever existed.

Al Unser Jr.—A Checkered Past

as told to Jade Gurss

“There and back again” could be the theme of this story. It is not about image-burnishing but unblinking candor about the highest highs and the lowest lows, and that racing, even successfully, is not everything.

Mike Spence: Out of the Shadows

by Richard Jenkins

He was a man on the move both on the track and in his career but overshadowed by others in both. At his very peak, with a win in reach, he suffered a fatal crash during practice. At long last here is a proper biography to give Spence his due recognition.

Caesars Palace Grand Prix

by Randall Cannon

Las Vegas may be popular with gamblers but it wasn’t with racing drivers. The circuit was boring and flat as a parking lot, in fact it was a parking lot. And run counter-clockwise, and, oh, that heat. There is always talk of bringing racing back to Vegas—and this time without the Mob! The Mob?

Driven: The Men Who Made Formula One

by Kevin Eason

A colorful look by a long-time observer at the forces that turned a sport into a circus in which staggering amounts of money are to be made by those few who already have money—or genius or luck or connections—to even get a seat at the table.

Horst H. Baumann – Lichtjahre / Light Years

Once internationally renowned, Baumann is remembered, if at all, mostly for his pioneering work with lasers and light sculpture. But once upon a time, if only for a mere five years, he turned his artistic mind to motorsports photography, and was among the first to do it in color.

Indy Split: The Big Money Battle that Nearly Destroyed Indy Racing

by John Oreovicz

Big-time open-wheel racing in America is big business. And money is, as they say, the root of all evil. Followed by ego. If you can talk about CART, USAC, CRL, and IRL in the same sentence you know what this book will be about. It’s a bruising read—but there’s a happy end.

Foyt, Andretti, Petty: America’s Racing Trinity 

by Bones Bourcier

In the 100-year history of American motorsports there’s one particularly fertile period when the careers of several drivers bloomed and overlapped before becoming so big that today they are household names.