Alfa Romeo Tipo 105 RHD

by Patrick Dasse

Righthand-drive cars involve more than simply sticking the steering wheel on the other side of the cockpit. A whole lot of other engineering has to happen, much of which not visible. Until now.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Colin Chapman: Wayward Genius

by Mike Lawrence

The title hints at the dichotomy in the Lotus founder’s character but the book makes an effort to show that Chapman compartmentalized his waywardness: questionable morals as a friend and businessman but (almost) never in motorsports.

Building the B-17 Flying Fortress

by Bill Yenne

Well-trodden ground, you think. Turns out there’s a whole lot left to see. Aside from its photographic riches this book is a good synopsis of not only all B-17 variants and manufacturing blocks but also the overall development of the bomber as a strategic tool.

The Rootes Story, The Making of a Global Automotive Empire  

by Geoff Carverhill 

Rootes is about as British a carmaker/distributor as it gets but US connections abound, not least the Raymond Loewy one. This book is quite the deep dive and dispenses lots of detail in a very readable manner.

Delage, Records et Grand Prix

by Daniel Cabart & Sébastien Faurès Fustel de Coulanges

The marque went racing within a year of its founding. Outside of Delage circles it is not fully appreciated just how competent their racing cars were. This book puts one of the three distinct periods of success under the microscope. And we mean microscope.

Fuelin’ Around

by J.K. Kelly

There once was a racer who wondered if his fuel was all it could be. He taught himself chemistry and physics, didn’t blow himself up, and founded VP Racing Fuels which today is an internationally known name. This memoir is by someone who worked there for 30 years.

War at Sea: A Naval Atlas 1939–1945

by Marcus Faulkner

Every time you watch a movie or read a book about WWII naval engagements, this book should be in reach. Without it you’d have no real sense for space, distance, scale, and even time because movement on the open sea does not exactly happen at warp speed.

Porsche 356: Made by Reutter

by Frank Jung

For the first time ever a book reproduces some of the correspondence between the two firms, illustrating not just business details but the dynamics. Also, excerpts from oral histories accompany hundreds of photos from the shop floor.

Driverless America

by Joseph E. Hummer

Pick up any old consumer magazine and you’d think driverless cars are right around the corner. Well, it’s a big corner—but still, you should drive the heck out of whatever is in your garage right now! And also hope you don’t get run over . . . by an inattentive driver!

Forgotten Motoring, A Miscellany on the Open Road

by Peter Ashley

There is a certain charm in the assembly of miscellanies, and this book is an example of just how charming such an assemblage can be. Ashley’s eye, his sensibility, and his appreciation for ephemera combine to create quite the attractive volume, a sweetly polished little gem.

Indy Split: The Big Money Battle that Nearly Destroyed Indy Racing

by John Oreovicz

Big-time open-wheel racing in America is big business. And money is, as they say, the root of all evil. Followed by ego. If you can talk about CART, USAC, CRL, and IRL in the same sentence you know what this book will be about. It’s a bruising read—but there’s a happy end.