Air & Water: Rare Porsches, 1956–2019

by The Saratoga Auto Museum

The name of the author is the clue that this is a book about the Steven Harris Porsches that the museum featured in two separate exhibits in 2021. Many of his cars really are rare, and while he does drive them they live in different parts of the US and even the world. This book brings some of them together.

Road Trips, Head Trips, and Other Car-Crazed Writings

Edited by Jean Lindamood Jennings

This book might have been published back when Bill Clinton was beginning his second term in the White House but, if you’re hungry for a tasting menu of the finest car-themed journalism, this anthology will sate gourmet and gourmand alike.

The History of GM’s Ramjet Fuel Injection

by Kenneth W. Kayser

Ramjet fuel injection has been around since the 1950s—and you can still order it straight out of the current Chevrolet Performance Parts catalog. But the new electronic version has only visual similarities to the old mechanical system—and none of its problems. This book by a long-time GM engineer has the whole story.

Classic Engines, Modern Fuel: The Problems, the Solutions

by Paul Ireland

A compliation of articles the author wrote for various magazines about his Manchester University XPAG Tests. Features real data and practical descriptions applicable to all classic engines.

The Ferrari Place

by Jim Hunter

The unlikely story of a couple of youngish Ferrari owners in the 1970s venturing into the spare parts world to satisfy their own requirements only to recognize a wide unmet need and growing a multi-faceted business around it.

Lovers and Other Strangers: Jack Vettriano

by Anthony Quinn

Perhaps you’ve seen a print of Vettriano’s The Singing Butler in a friend’s home. Perhaps you own a copy yourself. As wonderful as that painting is, it is overshadowed by the artist’s noir paintings. This book is a fine introduction to the work of this controversial, enigmatic Scottish painter.

The Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Book

by René Staud & Jürgen Lewandowski

Examples from all series of SLs, almost 70 years worth, as German photographer René Staud sees them. And he’s seen many, probably 500, and photographing SLs has been one constant in his decades-long career.

Caesars Palace Grand Prix

by Randall Cannon

Las Vegas may be popular with gamblers but it wasn’t with racing drivers. The circuit was boring and flat as a parking lot, in fact it was a parking lot. And run counter-clockwise, and, oh, that heat. There is always talk of bringing racing back to Vegas—and this time without the Mob! The Mob?

The Curtiss Hydroaeroplane: The U.S. Navy’s First Airplane 1911–1916

by Bob Woodling and Taras Chayka

The story of the first truly successful seaplane is here told against the backdrop of the all-important human factor: how people find each other, work together, and make the sum greater than its parts.

The Riley M.P.H.: A History of Its Development & Production 1932–1935

by Robin Cameron

Blink—and you missed it! Not because it’s so fast but because it was offered for only half a year and in all of 14 copies. Like many other makers’ “Vitesse” or “Speed” models Riley’s “MPH” was less about nominal speed than the idea of speed.

UFO Drawings From The National Archives

by David Clarke 

Some say The Truth is Out There. Even if it is, so is a whole load of other stuff. Fake news is not news! This delightfully left-field book shows how the UFO phenomenon has been a rich seam mined by a diversity of Britons, ranging from the self-delusional to the unsettlingly sane.

The American Steam Locomotive in the Twentieth Century

by Tom Morrison

So, so big—and so, so inefficient. But the industrialized world could not have become what it did without these behemoths, so here is a behemoth of a book to tell their story.