The American Speed Shop

by Bob McClurg

Speed shop is such an established term that you find it in the dictionary, certainly an American one. Back in the day, many shops didn’t just sell over the counter go-fast parts but made their own, and all were places in which to hang out and talk shop.

1994: The Untold Story of a Tragic and Controversial F1 Season

by Ibrar Malik

A veritable Annus Horibilis. If you paid attention you probably have an opinion or three. So did the author, but he ended up revising some of them in the course of writing this book! Will you?

Maserati A6G 2000: Frua, Pininfarina, Vignale, and Allemano

by Walter Bäumer

Chassis histories of 53 cars, compiled by an author whose auto consultancy has brokered several of them. Plenty of period photos—but the asking prices in the period ads will make you weep.

Jaguar D-Type, The Autobiography of XKD 504

by Philip Porter & Chas Parker

You can still see this 1955 car being raced today, with abandon, and successfully. In its day it was the ultimate sports racer. Few have survived in this original a form which is why this is the one to which an entire book is devoted.

Mr. Le Mans: Tom Kristensen

by Tom Kristensen with Dan Philipsen

Sebring has a Kristensen corner, Le Mans has had him on the podium more times than anyone else. Many are the feathers in his cap. But is he a nice guy? Why, yes—meet him here.

Cadillac V-16s

Three books by Christopher Cummings

Cadillac’s top-of-the line model was ultra-refined and ultra-expensive. Even its almost-silent engine was designed by a stylist. It was launched at a time when the longterm repercussions of the Great Depression were not fully foreseeable but its prospective buyers wouldn’t have cared anyway.

Alfa Romeo Tipo 105 RHD

by Patrick Dasse

Righthand-drive cars involve more than simply sticking the steering wheel on the other side of the cockpit. A whole lot of other engineering has to happen, much of which not visible. Until now.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Colin Chapman: Wayward Genius

by Mike Lawrence

The title hints at the dichotomy in the Lotus founder’s character but the book makes an effort to show that Chapman compartmentalized his waywardness: questionable morals as a friend and businessman but (almost) never in motorsports.

Building the B-17 Flying Fortress

by Bill Yenne

Well-trodden ground, you think. Turns out there’s a whole lot left to see. Aside from its photographic riches this book is a good synopsis of not only all B-17 variants and manufacturing blocks but also the overall development of the bomber as a strategic tool.

The Rootes Story, The Making of a Global Automotive Empire  

by Geoff Carverhill 

Rootes is about as British a carmaker/distributor as it gets but US connections abound, not least the Raymond Loewy one. This book is quite the deep dive and dispenses lots of detail in a very readable manner.

Delage, Records et Grand Prix

by Daniel Cabart & Sébastien Faurès Fustel de Coulanges

The marque went racing within a year of its founding. Outside of Delage circles it is not fully appreciated just how competent their racing cars were. This book puts one of the three distinct periods of success under the microscope. And we mean microscope.