Archive for Items Categorized 'British', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

XKD 603 Through the Lens of Time

by Clive Beecham

Every D-type is special—few were made and the one here is one of only six surviving long-noses. It was raced hard and successfully and 60-odd years later it’s not only still around but in largely original condition! A story worth reading, and in a rather spectacular book.

9600 HP, The Story of the World’s Oldest E-Type

by Philip Porter

Not just any old E-Type but the one from the launch in 1961. It has survived and was gloriously restored—after gathering dust in a barn for two decades. Many hands have touched the car, many things have happened to it—and it’s all here.

Morris – the Cars and the Company

by Jon Pressnell

There once was a time when modest Morris owned the largest-ever share of the British market. What happened? Lots of new material sheds light on the matter.

Morgans for a Lifetime: In Prose and Poetry

by Larry Ayers

He’s raced Morgans and restored them, toured and traveled the world in them. Now he salutes and celebrates with prose and poetry the Morgans, in all their flavors, that have given him so much pleasure.

Lotus Elite: Colin Chapman’s first GT Car

by Matthew Vale

Some called it the best-looking car ever. The press lauded it. To break into the road car market Lotus kept the price so low they hardly made money on it. If you wanted it even cheaper, you could buy it as a kit. Still it took six years to sell just about a thousand. Sounds like a complex story.

Lawrie Bond, Microcar Man

by Nick Wotherspoon

Bond was involved with so much more than the 3-wheelers everyone associates with him. This expanded version of an older book offers even more detail and sheds light on the art and science of a small company building small vehicles.

The Spirit of the Age

by Davide Bassoli

Hardly the sexiest Rolls-Royces and Bentleys ever but for their buyers they were the only game in town at that segment of the market. Over their 20-year production run many modifications were made, not least the first-ever disappearing mascot.

Jaguar D-Type, The Autobiography of XKD 504

by Philip Porter & Chas Parker

You can still see this 1955 car being raced today, with abandon, and successfully. In its day it was the ultimate sports racer. Few have survived in this original a form which is why this is the one to which an entire book is devoted.

The Rootes Story, The Making of a Global Automotive Empire  

by Geoff Carverhill 

Rootes is about as British a carmaker/distributor as it gets but US connections abound, not least the Raymond Loewy one. This book is quite the deep dive and dispenses lots of detail in a very readable manner.

The Land Rover Story

by Dave Phillips

Beginning with the 1970s Range Rover model, the Spartan, rugged Landy of yore has moved resolutely upmarket. It still goes, true to its motto, “Above & Beyond” but the firm has also just recorded its largest financial loss in history. A big story, told here by a marque expert.

Lotus Europa, Colin Chapman’s Mid-Engined Masterpiece

by Matthew Vale

From design and engineering to owners’ observations about running one of these things this is the only book dedicated purely to the Europa. The book may not change your mind about its looks but it’ll make you see it with new eyes and understand why it mattered.

Making A Marque: Rolls-Royce Motor Car Promotion 1904–1940

by Peter Moss and Richard Roberts

If a tree falls in the forrest. . .. What good is it to have a great product if no one knows it? Advertising to the rescue. Rolls-Royce spent colossal sums on it, and looking at it today we find it tells much more than meets the eye.