Archive for Items Categorized 'British', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

VANWALL, The Story of Britain’s first Formula 1 World Champions

by Jenkinson & Posthumus, with D. Nye

Ever noticed the MAHLE logo on a modern race car? British industrialist Tony Vandervell’s old company became part of that group in 2007. He got many things right, including his F1 team.

Jaguar E-Type Factory and Private Competition Cars

by Peter Griffiths

Wait, the sexy “crumpet-catcher” was a serious race car? Campaigned by regular people? To this day? Yes, yes, and yes. And finally there’s a book about all of them, not just the Lightweights!

Silver Cloud II Brochure 

Quiet elegance with an appeal to a classic era. This could be said of the Rolls-Royce and Bentley models of the 1950s and 1960s. It could also describe this brochure for the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II and the Phantoms, Bentleys, and Bentley Continentals—1959 to 1962.

Those Elegant Rolls-Royce

by Lawrence Dalton

This first of the five Rolls-Royce books lifelong motoring enthusiast Lawrie Dalton would write covers the range of coachwork mounted on Rolls-Royce chassis from 1907–1939. To produce the best book possible, he started his own publishing house; that was half a century ago, and it still exists.

Around the World in a Napier – the Story of Two Motoring Pioneers

by Andrew M. Jepson

Around the world in 80 days?? Nah. Make that six years—and 46,528 miles, and 39 countries. They literally went were no one had been before. And you can follow them here.

Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud, The Complete Story

by James Taylor

If you see one you can’t fail to notice it—and admire it. Admit it. If you want to know the story behind it, this book will set you on the right path, and while the car may have been for the ultra rich the book is a paltry $40!

Coachwork on the Rolls-Royce Twenty, 20/25, 25/30 and Wraith: 1922–1939

by James Taylor

Cars of this era did not come with standard bodies—you spec’d your own, from your preferred coachbuilder. Several thousand of these “small” Rolls-Royces were built so there’s lots to cover here.

Lola: The T70 and Can-Am Cars

by Gordon Jones

Go to a big-name vintage race and chances are you’ll see a T70 in action, one of the best-looking race cars of its time. Decades in the making, this book explains the success of the lithe British car with the brawny American motors.

Jaguar Century: 100 Years of Automotive Excellence

by Giles Chapman

Strictly speaking it’s not Jaguar Cars that is a hundred years old but the 1922 predecessor company. The early brand philosophy is still evident today, but one important virtue is not: that you get more car than you pay for. With Jaguar poised to move way, way upmarket everything in this book will make you wish you bought one sooner.

XKD 603 Through the Lens of Time

by Clive Beecham

Every D-type is special—few were made and the one here is one of only six surviving long-noses. It was raced hard and successfully and 60-odd years later it’s not only still around but in largely original condition! A story worth reading, and in a rather spectacular book.

9600 HP, The Story of the World’s Oldest E-Type

by Philip Porter

Not just any old E-Type but the one from the launch in 1961. It has survived and was gloriously restored—after gathering dust in a barn for two decades. Many hands have touched the car, many things have happened to it—and it’s all here.

Morris – the Cars and the Company

by Jon Pressnell

There once was a time when modest Morris owned the largest-ever share of the British market. What happened? Lots of new material sheds light on the matter.