Archive for Items Categorized 'British', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The Riley M.P.H.: A History of Its Development & Production 1932–1935

by Robin Cameron

Blink—and you missed it! Not because it’s so fast but because it was offered for only half a year and in all of 14 copies. Like many other makers’ “Vitesse” or “Speed” models Riley’s “MPH” was less about nominal speed than the idea of speed.

The Singer Story: The Cars, Commercial Vehicles, Bicycles & Motorcycles

by Kevin Atkinson

Everyone knows that Bugattis used distinctive flat-spoke aluminum wheels. So did Singer—but 20 years earlier. The curved front forks of a bicycle are a George Singer patent, and still in use today. If you don’t know Singer, you should.

The Complete Catalogue of British Cars 1895–1975 

by Culshaw & Horrobin

It seems farfetched nowadays but once upon a time the British motor industry was thriving. First published in 1974, this book catalogs some 700 manufacturers and 3700 models—and those are just the production passenger cars.

Alvis Society, A Century of Drivers

by David Culshaw

From kings to serial killers, people who chose an Alvis were a discerning lot. Every car ever made is recorded here, and only here.

VANWALL, The Story of Britain’s first Formula 1 World Champions

by Jenkinson & Posthumus, with D. Nye

Ever noticed the MAHLE logo on a modern race car? British industrialist Tony Vandervell’s old company became part of that group in 2007. He got many things right, including his F1 team.

Jaguar E-Type Factory and Private Competition Cars

by Peter Griffiths

Wait, the sexy “crumpet-catcher” was a serious race car? Campaigned by regular people? To this day? Yes, yes, and yes. And finally there’s a book about all of them, not just the Lightweights!

Silver Cloud II Brochure 

Quiet elegance with an appeal to a classic era. This could be said of the Rolls-Royce and Bentley models of the 1950s and 1960s. It could also describe this brochure for the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II and the Phantoms, Bentleys, and Bentley Continentals—1959 to 1962.

Those Elegant Rolls-Royce

by Lawrence Dalton

This first of the five Rolls-Royce books lifelong motoring enthusiast Lawrie Dalton would write covers the range of coachwork mounted on Rolls-Royce chassis from 1907–1939. To produce the best book possible, he started his own publishing house; that was half a century ago, and it still exists.

Around the World in a Napier – the Story of Two Motoring Pioneers

by Andrew M. Jepson

Around the world in 80 days?? Nah. Make that six years—and 46,528 miles, and 39 countries. They literally went were no one had been before. And you can follow them here.

Freestone & Webb, 1923–1958

by James Taylor

“Top Hat” and “Razor Edge” were just some of the clever ideas this coachbuilder had up their sleeve, they won gold medals nine years in a row, and were among the last five big remaining firms. But bespoke coachwork went the way of the dodo bird and it is little consolidation that F&W went out in a blaze of glory.

Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud, The Complete Story

by James Taylor

If you see one you can’t fail to notice it—and admire it. Admit it. If you want to know the story behind it, this book will set you on the right path, and while the car may have been for the ultra rich the book is a paltry $40!

Coachwork on the Rolls-Royce Twenty, 20/25, 25/30 and Wraith: 1922–1939

by James Taylor

Cars of this era did not come with standard bodies—you spec’d your own, from your preferred coachbuilder. Several thousand of these “small” Rolls-Royces were built so there’s lots to cover here.