Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Flying Wings & Radical Things

by Tony Chong

You may think you know what all came out of Northrop Grumman over the years. You don’t; even if you worked there . . . This book will add a whole new list of names to drop at your next party.

British Secret Projects: Jet Fighters Since 1950

by Tony Buttler

Lots of aircraft went into production—but so, so, so many more remained at the thought or test stage. This book looks at the jet fighter side of it, and it is the one whose original version launched a whole series of books—with no end in sight.

The Trans-Atlantic Pioneers

by Bruce Hales-Dutton

2019 marked the centenary of the first nonstop transatlantic flight. You’d think the world would be awash in books—but this seems to be the only one! Good thing it’s a fine, if bland, one.

Balloonomania Belles: Daredevil Divas Who First Took to the Sky

by Sharon Wright

“Balloon influenza.” (Gesundheit) Women parachuting out of balloons, dangling from ropes beneath it or sitting on a trapeze, calmly reading a (car!) magazine while sailing through a rainstorm? Prepare to be surprised.

1001 Aviation Facts

by Mike Machat, editor

From the Wright Brothers to space flight and from the real world to make-believe (TV/movies, model aircraft) this book will put a few—well, 1001—arrows in your quiver to dazzle and impress at the next cocktail party.

When Rolls and Royce Made History on Dover’s White Cliffs

by Paul Tritton

This small book adds useful detail to a lesser-known chapter of the history of not only the two cofounders of Rolls-Royce but two other important men in the firm’s, and Britain’s history.

Training the Right Stuff: The Aircraft That Produced America’s Jet Pilots

by Mark A. Frankel & Tommy H. Thomason

Jets behaved like nothing before them; accident rates soared. It wasn’t until 1948 that the military had a proper jet trainer—developed with private funds! This splendid book takes us from biplane to high-tech simulator.

The Vintage Years of Airfix Box Art

by Roy Cross

“Don’t judge a book by its cover!” But do judge an Airfix kit by its box top! Countless people did just that—and Airfix sold millions of its kits on the strength of their dramatic, dynamic, and realistic box-top artwork.

Aviation Records in the Jet Age

by William A. Flanagan

A nicely curated and well written overview—more than a highlight reel but not an encyclopedia. You really will be amazed by how far we’ve come in a relatively short time.

“Sam” – Marshal of the Royal Air Force the Lord Elworthy

by Richard Mead

KG, GCB, CBE, DSO, LVO, DFC, AFC, MA—this letter salad bespeaks a highly decorated life. It is only fitting that a biography of this distinguished officer should appear during the RAF’s Centenary year.

Horten Ho 229

by Andrei I. Shepelev & Huib Ottens

The work of the Horten brothers is very remarkable, especially given their young age and the circumstances under which they worked. The Ho 229 was their last and most ambitious project—yielding lessons that are puzzling engineers still.

Soviet Naval Aviation 1946–1991

by Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov

A subject shrouded in mystery and suffering from spotty information. No more. Both history and machinery are covered.