Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

A Complete History of U.S. Combat Aircraft Fly-Off Competitions

by Erik Simonsen

How do military aircraft make the cut to be selected for active duty? And the ones that didn’t, what would they have looked like if they had made it into service? On the latter score, this book is a winner.

B-17 Gunner

by Craig A. Kleinsmith

Fifty-nine missions, that’s three years, three years of wondering if you’ll make it back. Shot down over Germany and taken prisoner, Eyer managed to keep a secret diary—and stay alive.

Transatlantic Airships: An Illustrated History

by John Christopher

From luxuriously appointed people-hauling “pond hoppers” that actually flew, to proposed atomic-powered leviathans replete with helipads this book takes a look at how to cross vast distances.

Secret Wings of World War II

by Lance Cole

Not a new subject at all; except, Cole takes it to places readers may find difficult to follow. “Polarizing” is the word; “interesting,” sure.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Building the B-17 Flying Fortress

by Bill Yenne

Well-trodden ground, you think. Turns out there’s a whole lot left to see. Aside from its photographic riches this book is a good synopsis of not only all B-17 variants and manufacturing blocks but also the overall development of the bomber as a strategic tool.

Yakolev Fighters of World War Two

by Yefim Gordon, Sergey & Dmitriy Komissarov

Everyone knows Mustangs and Spits and FW 109s, but Yaks? These Russian fighters were crude only by comparison but fundamentally no less competent. Based on newly released material these veteran authors advance the story another big step.

Valkyrie: The North American XB-70

by Graham M. Simons 

70,000 ft of altitude, Mach 3, and the crew is in shirtsleeves. None of these three things are normal. This super plane took supersonic flight to the edge of the envelope. And then it died.

The B-25 in the Backyard

by Walter C. Soplata

Talk about taking your work home . . . the author worked in a scrapyard, and, being an aviation enthusiast, hated to have to cut up so many interesting bits. So he bought stuff, from motors to entire airfames. Good thing he had a large lot!

Dornier Do 335 Pfeil/Arrow

by J. Richard Smith and Eddie J. Creek

Fast the Arrow was but it never flew in combat. It made its greatest contribution to aviation during post-WWII testing by the Allies, aided by the German experts who had originally built it. From origins to “what if” studies, this book has it.

Go Fast or Go Home: The Garth Hogan Story

by Tim Hanna

Dragster racer, record holder, FIA commissioner, founder of multiple businesses, pilot, restorer, museum founder—just reading this list makes you wonder if the differences in cyclonic motion in the hemispheres affects how time flies on Zealandia.

Nimrod’s Genesis: RAF Maritime Patrol Projects and Weapons Since 1945

by Chris Gibson

The jet-powered Nimrod submarine hunter that was the right answer during the Cold War found itself increasingly too much of a plane for the low-and-slow patrol jobs—and now it’s out of a job, retired from active service, but missed.