Archive for Items Categorized 'Aviation', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Cosmos, The Infographic Book of Space

by Stuart Lowe & Chris North

Space. You know it’s out there, but sizes, distances, temporal relationships are impossibly hard to visualize. Not anymore.

Tupolev Tu144: The Soviet Supersonic Airliner

by Yefim Gordon, Dmitriy Komissarov, Vladimir Rigmant

This icon of Soviet national prestige did take to the skies before the Concorde but ended up having a much shorter service life. Of the few publications devoted specifically to this aircraft, this book is the most complete yet.

The Douglas B-18 and B-23: America’s Forsaken Warriors

by Dan Hagedorn Sr. & Dan Hagedorn Jr.

Jack of all trades, master of none. That’s history’s verdict, but is it deserved? The authors have spent years researching the subject and many of their arguments have generic application to the question of institutionalized bias and uncritical journalism.

Schneider Trophy Seaplanes and Flying Boats

by Ralph Pegram

Over a hundred different aircraft are covered here, along with a thorough look at the reasons for air racing, as well as technical developments and the historical/political picture.

A Complete History of U.S. Combat Aircraft Fly-Off Competitions

by Erik Simonsen

How do military aircraft make the cut to be selected for active duty? And the ones that didn’t, what would they have looked like if they had made it into service? On the latter score, this book is a winner.

B-17 Gunner

by Craig A. Kleinsmith

Fifty-nine missions, that’s three years, three years of wondering if you’ll make it back. Shot down over Germany and taken prisoner, Eyer managed to keep a secret diary—and stay alive.

Transatlantic Airships: An Illustrated History

by John Christopher

From luxuriously appointed people-hauling “pond hoppers” that actually flew, to proposed atomic-powered leviathans replete with helipads this book takes a look at how to cross vast distances.

Secret Wings of World War II

by Lance Cole

Not a new subject at all; except, Cole takes it to places readers may find difficult to follow. “Polarizing” is the word; “interesting,” sure.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Building the B-17 Flying Fortress

by Bill Yenne

Well-trodden ground, you think. Turns out there’s a whole lot left to see. Aside from its photographic riches this book is a good synopsis of not only all B-17 variants and manufacturing blocks but also the overall development of the bomber as a strategic tool.

Yakolev Fighters of World War Two

by Yefim Gordon, Sergey & Dmitriy Komissarov

Everyone knows Mustangs and Spits and FW 109s, but Yaks? These Russian fighters were crude only by comparison but fundamentally no less competent. Based on newly released material these veteran authors advance the story another big step.

Valkyrie: The North American XB-70

by Graham M. Simons 

70,000 ft of altitude, Mach 3, and the crew is in shirtsleeves. None of these three things are normal. This super plane took supersonic flight to the edge of the envelope. And then it died.