Archive for Items Categorized 'Racing, Rally', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Racing in Daytona Beach, Sunshine, Sand & Speed

by Robert Redd

From land speed records to NASCAR, a lot happed at The Daytona Beach and Road Course before it closed in 1958 and racing moved to the Daytona International Speedway. A local historian tracks the path from hard-packed sand to superspeedway.

Bonneville’s Women of Land Speed Racing

by “Landspeed” Louise Ann Noeth

Unlike other forms of motorsports, gender doesn’t seem to be an inherently restrictive factor on the salt. Over 200 women have stepped up to the starting line, and dozen of them have set records. Many more work the event behind the scenes, and then there are the engineers and builders.

312 P: One of Ferrari’s Most Beautiful Racers

by Gianni Agnesa

Enzo Ferrari, that arch proponent of “function over form,” is said to have made one exception: the 312 P. It may only be an anecdote but what facts are known about this car are in this book, along with fantastic period photos.

Jaguar D-Type, The Autobiography of XKD 504

by Philip Porter & Chas Parker

You can still see this 1955 car being raced today, with abandon, and successfully. In its day it was the ultimate sports racer. Few have survived in this original a form which is why this is the one to which an entire book is devoted.

Mr. Le Mans: Tom Kristensen

by Tom Kristensen with Dan Philipsen

Sebring has a Kristensen corner, Le Mans has had him on the podium more times than anyone else. Many are the feathers in his cap. But is he a nice guy? Why, yes—meet him here.

Colin Chapman: Wayward Genius

by Mike Lawrence

The title hints at the dichotomy in the Lotus founder’s character but the book makes an effort to show that Chapman compartmentalized his waywardness: questionable morals as a friend and businessman but (almost) never in motorsports.

Delage, Records et Grand Prix

by Daniel Cabart & Sébastien Faurès Fustel de Coulanges

The marque went racing within a year of its founding. Outside of Delage circles it is not fully appreciated just how competent their racing cars were. This book puts one of the three distinct periods of success under the microscope. And we mean microscope.

Fuelin’ Around

by J.K. Kelly

There once was a racer who wondered if his fuel was all it could be. He taught himself chemistry and physics, didn’t blow himself up, and founded VP Racing Fuels which today is an internationally known name. This memoir is by someone who worked there for 30 years.

Indy Split: The Big Money Battle that Nearly Destroyed Indy Racing

by John Oreovicz

Big-time open-wheel racing in America is big business. And money is, as they say, the root of all evil. Followed by ego. If you can talk about CART, USAC, CRL, and IRL in the same sentence you know what this book will be about. It’s a bruising read—but there’s a happy end.

The Boy: Stirling Moss, A Life in 60 Laps

by Richard Williams

The era-defining British racing driver died in 2020, which will surely spawn a plethora of commemorative books. Williams’ is the first, and, taking a fresh approach, it sets a high bar.

Cars at Speed, Classic Stories from Grand Prix’s Golden Age

by Robert Daley

Two of the serious must-have racing reads are under this author’s byline. They are among his earliest work and possibly even more thrilling to read today—because no one does it like this anymore—than they were then.

Quest for Speed: The Epic Saga of Record-Breaking on Land

by Barry John

Ever watch a car break the sound barrier? If it’s a blur to look at, imagine what it looks like from inside the cockpit! When Chuck Yeager had done it in the air half a century before, he too was rattled. This book covers highlights of the 100-year LSR history.