The Douglas B-18 and B-23: America’s Forsaken Warriors

by Dan Hagedorn Sr. & Dan Hagedorn Jr.

Jack of all trades, master of none. That’s history’s verdict, but is it deserved? The authors have spent years researching the subject and many of their arguments have generic application to the question of institutionalized bias and uncritical journalism.

Mustang by Design

by Jimmy Dinsmore and James Halderman

With all the ink that has been spilled on the Mustang, there was still one book that was missing: this one. As the key designer of the model he initially dubbed “Cougar” Halderman is the ultimate insider’s insider.

The First Jet Pilot: The Story of German Test Pilot Erich Warsitz

by Lutz Warsitz

In just a few short years Warsitz went from fledgling sport flier to chief test pilot at Peenemünde West. What he knew was so valuable that the Russians hauled him off to Siberia after WWII when he wouldn’t spill the beans!

Isky: Ed Iskenderian and the History of Hot Rodding

by Matt Stone
The biggest names in racing were running Isky cams and Ed “the Camfather” made sure the world knew it and so became a household name. He’ still hanging around “the drags” so read the book before you run into him!

Neil “Soapy” Castles

by Henry Neil “Soapy” Castles

Living life to its fullest could be Castles’ motto. From NASCAR legend, to Hollywood insider, to taking on Exxon for groundwater contamination (a contributing factor to his cancer) and prevailing over both, Castles tells his fast-paced story.

Gustav Mesmer, Flugradbauer

by Stefan Hartmaier (editor)

A trilingual story of a German inventor/artist/poet who wants to fly—by means of a human-powered flying bicycle or strapping wings to his back. Don’t laugh. It’s a sad story. Or is it?

The British Overseas Airways Corporation: A History

by Graham M. Simons

BOAC operated from the 1940s to 1974 and the transition from war- to peacetime, and the resulting new world order are important topics even aside from this book’s airline theme.

Simply Bev . . . “Determination is Everything”

by James H Cox

Often enough books are described as “a labor of love”—by which is meant a love for or of the subject sufficiently compelling to shoulder the burden of writing a book. Certainly this is true in this case, except that it couldn’t possibly have been a “burden” since its subject is a flesh and bones human being.

Shelby American Up Close and Behind the Scenes

by Dave Friedman

The years at Shelby’s first premises in Venice were critical and the people who worked there young and enthusiastic, Friedman among them. His photos are an insider’s look at that most American of outfits.

Bunty – Remembering a Gentleman of Noble Scottish-Irish Descent

by Halwart Schrader

A biography of a car dealer? Well, a legendary car dealer. Not always for the purest of reasons, though.

You’ll just have to read the book . . .

Reid Railton, Man of Speed

by Karl Ludvigsen

In its award presentation, the Royal Automobile Club called this book “magisterial.” No argument. A Railton obit referred to him as “an exceedingly capable engineer and designer.” No argument. Finally here’s a book to tell the full story.

Aston Martin DB: 70 Years

by Andrew Noakes

That Aston Martin is going strong today is largely due to a fellow in the 1940s who had money enough to spare, for long enough to take AM to the top tier.