Tony Southgate, From Drawing Board to Chequered Flag

by Tony Southgate

For someone who first started to be interested in motor racing in 1982, Southgate was consistently present in the background of the races I watched.

Rolls-Royce Camargue, Crewe Saviour

by Bernard King

It was the most expensive production car in the world. It was the most British of cars—designed by the most Italian of coachbuilders. It went from clean sheet to 1:1 prototype in under three months. A mere 534 were built in 12 years. Never heard of it? Well, there’s a story.

Advertising the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud and Bentley S Series

by Davide Bassoli

Did the iconic Silver Cloud have iconic advertising? You bet, and not just the timeless Ogilvy & Mathers one about the noise of the clock. In fact, this book shows not only ads of the cars but about a host of other products, competitors, and OEM suppliers.

Supermarine Spitfire V

by Robert Grudzień

More than 44 color profiles of the most successful Spitfire version ever will take advanced scale modelers to a new level.

Born to Be Wild

by Randy D. McBee

Bikers—menace to society or upstanding citizens? Want to look at motorcycling from a scholarly point of view? If class, race, gender, sexual orientation, stereotypes, and politics interest you as much as cubic inches and spark plug gaps, this is the book.

3-D Movies

by R.M. Hayes

The “hyperhaptic visuality” in Avatar in 2009 may have created a lot of hoopla—only to then fizz out again—but the 3D film process was already over a hundred years old by then! From specific movies to how they’re made and on what equipment, this book by an industry insider is a good overview.

A Grand Complication

by Stacy Perman

This gripping social commentary and fine character study pins two men against each other who yearn to add the most complicated watch ever to their collections.

The Other Yellow Rolls Royce

by Neil Fraser

He’s a tinkerer with some mechanical aptitude but no vintage-car background. He bought a wreck of a 1929 Rolls-Royce. He restored it. Then he wrote this book about it. Masochism, all.

My Greatest Defeat

by Will Buxton 

“What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger.” Easier said than done! Even if it does, extreme experiences leave their mark and take a toll. Racing drivers are always only one step away from crippling disaster. Here twenty of them allow a look behind the PR-polished façade.

America’s Round-Engine Airliners

by Craig Kodera and William Pearce

Vibration, noise, roughness, creature comforts—early air travel really was rudimentary. The radial or star engine opened a new chapter and, for a while, was the best technical solution. But in its very advantages (cooling) lay the roots of its obsolescence (drag).

Return to Power: The Grands Prix of 1966 and 1967

by Michael Frostick

On the face of it, an interesting era in racing and an author who would pen many worthy tomes. Alas, this isn’t one of them.

The Royal Udaipur RR GLK21

by Anu Vikram Singh, Narayan Rupani, Gautam Sen

From scrap heap to the Pebble Beach Concours, a little Rolls-Royce goes on a big journey.