Red Tape and White Knuckles: One Woman’s Motorcycle Adventure through Africa

by Lois Pryce

No fancy bike, no fancy gear, no fancy Adventure Tours outfit—just one woman and her little Yamaha taking on the Dark Continent. Sadly, no fancy photographs either—you’ll have to use your imagination.

Betrayed: Secrecy, Lies, and Consequences

by Frederic H. Martini

Being a POW is hard enough. Not being believed afterwards, and even being denied disability benefits is worse. Having someone who knew of your plight but didn’t help be hailed as a hero is . . . well . . . this book will make you question who the good guys are.

Gentleman Heroes

by Giles Chapman with Clare Hay

If there is such a thing as “the most recognizable Bentley,” this may be the one. It didn’t win a lot, it didn’t hold up very well, but it played a singular and important role. And its price today is in the stratosphere.

A Life in Car Design – Jaguar, Lotus, TVR

by Oliver Winterbottom

After a half century of design—and not only cars—there are stories to tell, insights to share, and a new generation to motivate. You may have never heard of Winterbottom but this book delivers.

Portrait in Oil, The Autobiography of Nubar Gulbenkian

by Nubar S. Gulbenkian

Eccentric and rich beyond measure, this Armenian business magnate and international playboy cut a large figure in life and even in death. An insightful and entertaining portrait of one of the key figures involved in the international oil trade beginning before the First World War.

“I Would Not Step Back . . .” Phil Lamason

by Hilary Pedersen and others

More than a just another war story, this book explains what made a quiet, humble man a leader even his enemies could not ignore.

Tumult in the Clouds: The Aviation Art of Russell Smith

by Jim Wilberg

Not only are 44 examples of Smith’s award-winning paintings shown and described but a dozen learned WW I specialists offer insights into airplanes, historic events, and the challenges of doing proper research.

Motors Finest, Rolls-Royce and Bentley from the Seeger Collection

by Peter Müller

Soon this private collection will be open to the public but unless your travels take you to Liechtenstein, this book is the only way to see the cars all in one place.

The Lancaster and the Tirpitz

by Tony Iveson & Brian Milton

The subtitle calls only the bomber “legendary” but not the battleship? A good and necessary book but a bit one-sided.

Frank McClean: The Godfather of British Naval Aviation

by Philip Jarrett 

Many important aviation developments wouldn’t have happened if McClean hadn’t had the means, the skills, and the convictions he possessed. At long last here’s a book to give credit where credit is due.

The Race to the North

by David Wragg

It took 400 horses to go by coach from London to Scotland. And time. Steam power changed everything but, for a while, railroad companies played silly—and dangerous—games to get the traveling public on board.

Donald Healey’s 8C Triumph Dolomite

by Jonathan Wood

With just three chassis and parts for six engines built, chances are you’ve not seen a 1934/35 Dolomite. They were the most expensive British open two-seaters of their day. None were sold—but they survived, and here is the full story.