Hubert Platt: Fast Fords of the “Georgia Shaker”

by Allen Platt

From moonshine runner to multiple Hall of Famer, Platt was a showman on and off the track. And if Chevrolet hadn’t pulled out of racing, the subtitle might well be reading differently. Written by one of his sons, who is himself a racer, the book explores an iconic career.

Bugatti Type 57 Grand Prix – A Celebration

by Neil Max Tomlinson

This book lives up to its billing as a “radical look…challenging traditional beliefs.” Who’d think that three (or four?) racecars could confound two (or three?) generations of historians?

Jim Clark: Racing Hero

by Graham Gauld

When the unassuming and versatile Scotsman died at the age of only 32 at the wheel of a racecar, he had already won more GPs and GP poles than anyone. If he was a hero, he was a reluctant one

Enzo Ferrari – Power, Politics, and the Making of an Automotive Empire

by Luca Dal Monte

Every minute you spend reading this review, Ferrari will sell 100 items with their name on them. Not cars—they, intentionally, hover around the 8000 per year mark—but “stuff,” from socks to books to engines for Maseratis. What is it about Ferrari that so many want to buy into its cachet? 1000 pages offer some answers.

A Century of Sea Travel: Personal Accounts from the Steamship Era

by Christopher Deakes & Tom Stanley

Relive a distinctive era in the history of transportation by, literally, sneaking a peek over peoples’ shoulders into their letters home or “notes to self.”

Gulf 917

by Ray Gillottti

The 917 story told from a specific angle, that of the John Wyer team whose tech chief really made the car fly. You may have stacks of 917 books already but you’ll not want to miss this one.

Superman, The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero

by Larry Tye

Little Orphan Annie and Oliver Twist have more in common with the Man of Steel than you might think and this is only of many surprising connections this book makes.

The Trans-Atlantic Pioneers

by Bruce Hales-Dutton

This year marks the centenary of the first nonstop transatlantic flight. You’d think the world would be awash in books—but this seems to be the only one! Good thing it’s a fine, if bland, one.

Porsche 901: The Roots of a Legend

by Jürgen Lewandowski

If you never knew there was such a thing as a Porsche 901 you’d look at it and think you were seeing a 911. Well, it’s not. Of the heaps of books about Porsches, this is the first truly detailed look at the 901.

Alpine Renault, the Fabulous Berlinettes

by Roy Smith

For the first time in English the full story of the little French road rocket of the 1970s is told. From concept car to modern-day club racing, it’s all here.

Hunting the Wind

by Teresa Webber & Jamie Dodson

A brief but meaningful and certainly heartfelt synopsis of the early years of the airline, in peace and war. Several of the contributors actually worked the boats and all of them bleed Pan Am blue.

Olympic Airways: A History

by Graham Simons

From weather to political leanings there’s a reason Greece was a factor in the plans of the early civil aviation schemers, and in short order the Greeks stood up a national airline of their own. It struggled then and it struggles today, and this book explains why.