The Road to the Top is Not on the Map

edited by Carla Bailo and Terry Barclay

Candid observations from high-level auto female auto industry execs look at the practical (cf. do you really need a graduate degree?) and the abstract (cf. finding joy in the workplace). Whether you’re just starting out or looking at a career change, there’s probably an idea here that could show the way.

A History of the Legendary 4 x 4 Ford Bronco

by Todd Zuercher

The fellow who brought you the Mustang also did the Bronco, Ford’s first SUV. Now it’s being reintroduced for 2021—and there is such demand that there’s an 18-month waitlist! This book explains what made it popular.

Shadow: The Magnificent Machines of a Man of Mystery

by Pete Lyons

That man of mystery was the quiet if not secretive Don Nichols, founder and principal of the Shadow team/s that competed quite successfully for 11 seasons—before fading into oblivion. For the first time, a proper book connects the dots.

Lartigue et les Autos de Course

by Pierre Darmendrail & Christophe Lavielle

From a 1905 to a 1978 race, this extraordinary photographer saw the world, and in this case race cars, in a very specific way. Students of photography and racing will find his photos remarkable.

The Human Archaeology of Space

Lunar, Planetary and Interstellar Relics of Exploration

by Peter Joseph Capelotti

Capelotti teaches archaeology and concerns himself with both terrestrial and aerospace archaeology. Here he successfully achieves his goal of gathering “into a single source the data on the artifacts that Homo Sapiens have discarded in space and place them into the framework of archaeology.”

Bentley – Last of the Silent Sports Cars 1938–9

by Ian Strang and John Boothman

For an all too brief moment in time, the overdrive Bentleys had their slice of the market all to themselves. No other car did what they did in just that way, which is why many/most first owners were auto industry types who knew a good thing when they saw it.

A Postcard History of Japanese Aviation: 1910–1945

by Edward M. Young

Japan adopted Western technologies late but then with a vigor unmatched by other Asian nations. Several hundred postcards tell that story here.

Great Grilles of the ‘50s

by Mark Misercola and Hank Kaczmarek

More than just another look at the orgy of brightwork that marked US cars of the era this book also offers model and body codes, original MSRP, basic specs, color charts, and current values.

Lessons in Imperial Rule

by Andrew Skeen

Sounds like “ancient history” but while it doesn’t have application today, it has implications that are still relevant in a world of terror and guerilla fighting.

Gentlemen, Start Your Engines!

by Jared Zaugg

Bonhams is an auction house through whose doors hundreds of delectable cars pass each year. This book showcases a few dozen that best embody the emotional impact that separate sports and race cars from more prosaic transport.

Some of the prices will have an emotional impact too . . .

The Ford Model A

by Robert C. Kreipke

Ford’s original entry into the automobile world, the Model T, was a runaway success—the A was too. Almost five million would be made so it’s no wonder that there are survivors and thus an active club scene—and books such as this, by Ford’s Corporate Historian and Manager of Special Projects.

Ladies of Lascaris: Christina Ratcliffe and the Forgotten Heroes of Malta’s War

by Paul McDonald

The RAF did tremendously important reconnaissance work on Malta, and the women and girls who worked as plotters and cipherenes helped. Obviously, they had private lives, and Ratcliffe’s in particular is way out there.