I Kept No Diary

by F.R.(Rod) Banks

If your motor requires high octane fuel it probably has high compression. Banks is the man who championed this technology—and a thousand other things—which is probably why he had no time to keep a diary. He was 80 when he wrote this book, and still working!

Brunei’s Bespoke Rolls-Royce and Bentleys

by Richard Vaughan

In the days of yore, it was the Indian potentates who counted among their playthings fabulously exotic, usually custom-made cars. In the 1990s the richest man in the world was said to be the Sultan of oil-rich Brunei and he too lives large. Little is known of his vast car collection so this book definitely opens new territory.

The Rooster Bar

by John Grisham

A tale of law students growing disillusioned—about their chosen profession, their mediocre school, crushing student loan debt. The students hatch a plan, and as so many plans hatched over a drink or three, things go a bit off the rails.

Roadside Relics: America’s Abandoned Automobiles

by Will Shiers

This look at scrapped American cars lain to rest in field and stream (yes, literally) not only documents relics of yesteryear but also a phenomenon that won’t exist much longer.

GM’s Motorama: The Glamorous Show Cars of a Cultural Phenomenon

by David W Temple

Lower, longer, wider. Often outrageously designed—and often enough outrageously impractical for real-word use (David Davis calls them “comic book fantasies” in his Introduction)—these show cars were the most American of American cars and American lifestyle.

Type VII: Germany’s Most Successful U-Boats

by Marek Krzysztalowicz

Never given subs a second thought? Using Germany’s WW II workhorse as an example this thorough book shows how they work and what it’s like to sail and live on one—and how the FBI in Long Island managed to arrest a crew and another ended up in the Tower of London!

Hypersonic

by Dennis R. Jenkins & Tony R. Landis

Over their 199 flights, the three X-15s obliterated records and returned benchmark hypersonic data for aircraft performance, stability and control, and materials. This book is so thorough you could probably build an X-15 from scratch!

Postcards of the Army Service Corps 1902–1918: Coming of Age

by Michael Young

From eggs to ammo, the Army Service Corps kept front-line troops fighting. This book presents hundred of postcards showing what the daily grind was like, and from locales to fashion, it gives anyone with an interest in things historical something to relate to.

De Dion Bouton, An Illustrated Guide to Type & Specification 1905–1914

by Michael Edwards

They were the world’s largest automobile manufacturer in the early days. This book shows how trying to be everything to everyone is a heavy cross to bear—and can ruin you.

The Art of Space

by Ron Miller

The moon and the stars and rocketships and, yes, aliens—here are examples of how artists throughout history and based on the scientific knowledge of their day have imagined that Final Frontier.

GT Love, 50 Years Opel GT

by Jens Cooper & Harald Hamprecht

This little Opel, the first-ever German concept car (1965), has more American connections that just being called the “baby Corvette.” As GM’s European subsidiary several US execs who would become industry heavyweights shaped the fates of this machine.

Remember Those Great Volkswagen Ads?

by Alfredo Marcantonio, David Abbott, John O’Driscoll

Hindsight is everything. What is now considered one of the greatest ad campaigns EVER was dismissed at the time by the very man who hatched it as a total mistake!