Jaguar D-Type, The Autobiography of XKD 504

by Philip Porter & Chas Parker

You can still see this 1955 car being raced today, with abandon, and successfully. In its day it was the ultimate sports racer. Few have survived in this original a form which is why this is the one to which an entire book is devoted.

Porsche 911 – The Practically Free Supercar

by Robert McGowan

Are you thinking of scratching that 911-shaped itch but worry about the cost? This book might help you get a good night’s sleep in that regard—but, if you thought yourself immune to the lure of the 911, it may also give you ideas . . .

The Aircraft-Spotter’s Film and Television Companion

by Simon D. Beck

An indispensable companion when you watch a movie and wonder “What was that??” The book tells you that, and more: who flew it, who built it, where is it, was it real?

Mythical Formula One: 1966 to Present

by Marcel Correa

Color drawings of fifty racecars highlight what made each one special and allow comparisons of one car to another.

Shelby American Up Close and Behind the Scenes

by Dave Friedman

The years at Shelby’s first premises in Venice were critical and the people who worked there young and enthusiastic, Friedman among them. His photos are an insider’s look at that most American of outfits.

Driven, An Elegy to Cars, Roads and Motorsport

by John Aston

This is a book for an unhurried moment when you have the time to roll words around in your head. If your interest is motorsports and the people and places that give it color, all the better but that’s not all you’ll find here.

Aviation Records in the Jet Age

by William A. Flanagan

A nicely curated and well written overview—more than a highlight reel but not an encyclopedia. You really will be amazed by how far we’ve come in a relatively short time.

Balloonomania Belles: Daredevil Divas Who First Took to the Sky

by Sharon Wright

“Balloon influenza.” (Gesundheit) Women parachuting out of balloons, dangling from ropes beneath it or sitting on a trapeze, calmly reading a (car!) magazine while sailing through a rainstorm? Prepare to be surprised.

Michigan’s C. Harold Wills

by Alan Naldrett and Lynn Lyon Naldrett

His engineering skills were high, indeed. The car he eventually designed and built, though in small numbers, was and is to this day highly respected for its high quality. Sadly this book about C. Harold Wills is a disappointment.

Steve McQueen: Le Mans in the Rearview Mirror

by Donald Nunley

A prop master on a movie sees a lot. This book is written by one, and he sure did see a lot. It seems it took him years to get over it. If you can’t decide whether you love or hate the movie, this book will at least explain why it all went so very wrong.

Zagato Milano 1919–2009, The Official Book

This book does not come right out and say what it is. Neither do the press release or the advertising copy. If you know of Nada’s other Zagato books you would assume this new one to be along the lines of those others. It isn’t.

Fins

by William Knoedelseder

Either the cover car is really low or the fella really tall. It’s more the latter—and Earl towered not only over his department (“team” was not a word in his vocabulary) but his industry, and, for a while, the consumer. But tastes did change; Earl did not.