Peter Falk, 33 Years of Porsche Rennsport and Development

by Peter Falk and Wilfried Müller

As Porsche’s most successful head of motorsports, Falk made enormous contributions—that the world at large rarely heard about. “Falk talks . . . at last” is how the book begins and right out of the gate tickles the imagination and sets the breezy tone for what is to follow.

Under the Spotlight

by Davide Bassoli

The mere mention of the words “Earls Court show car” in a For Sale ad is bound even today to raise a car’s profile because it would have been a tricked-out example of what all a coachbuilder or carmaker could do.

Mille Miglia, 1000 Miles of Passion

40 towns in 48 hours. Anyone with the right car and about €8500 can apply. Take a look at the 2014 event to see if this is for you.

Lime Rock Park

This natural-terrain road racing venue is the oldest continuously operating track in the US and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Two good books, 30 years apart, explain its appeal—and how banning racing on Sundays can be a good thing.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Lawrie Bond, Microcar Man

by Nick Wotherspoon

Bond was involved with so much more than the 3-wheelers everyone associates with him. This expanded version of an older book offers even more detail and sheds light of the art and science of a small company building small vehicles.

Early Australian Automotive Design: The First Fifty Years

by Norm Darwin

The automotive industry is one of the most significant Australian industries of the twentieth century. It began around 1895—and only now is there a comprehensive account of the design side of it, not just overall styling but component/industrial design.

Building the Star of India

by David M. Cox

Would you be able to tell from the cover photo that this is a 22″-long model?? With thousands of parts, many fully functional? You do have to be a rocket scientist to build these things—or you have to know the fellow who wrote this book and can build yours.

Armoured Trains: An Illustrated Encyclopedia 1825–2016

by Paul Malmassari

From a battleship on rails to nimble if sometimes slapdash scout trolley, armored—and armed—trains have seen action much more recently than you might think. They have their limits but obviously they fulfill a role only they can do. This book gives you almost 200 years of examples.

Space Odyssey

by Michael Benson

The movie is still fantastic. It has aged very, very well. Michael Benson tells the story of its conception, gestation and birth. He did his job so well that our reviewer was too involved and engrossed to actually write a proper review, but, please, check out his attempt . . .

British Armoured Car Operations In World War One

by Bryan Perrett

WW I was the first conflict to see widespread use of mechanization, a threshold hybrid stage where horse, camel, and mule fought alongside car, tank, and airplane. All except the latter are discussed here.

Ballooning: A History, 1782–1900

by Kotar & Gessler

Many aeronautic “firsts” were accomplished in balloons. Some records haven’t been bettered in decades (altitude, highest parachute jump). How did it start? Why didn’t it last?