Concours Retrospective

by Richard Adatto

Showing cars off is as old as the car itself. At its most rarefied level this takes the form of the high-end, blue chip, highly curated concours that documents as much as it builds the history of the automobile.

Il Cavallino Nel Cuore, Autobiography of a Designer

by Leonardo Fioravanti

From junior stylist to Managing Director at Pininfarina, high-level positions at Fiat and Ferrari, his own design-engineering-architecture firm—this fabulously illustrated book offers rich detail of a rich life.

Clydebank Battlecruisers: Forgotten Photographs From John Brown’s Shipyard

by Ian Johnston

This storied shipyard built five of the Royal Navy’s thirteen battlecruisers and not only had the foresight to document their work photographically but to hold on to the photos for decades—which is why a hundred years later this excellent book is possible.

Rocket and Jet Aircraft of the Third Reich

by Terry C. Treadwell

A popular subject these days—but this book won’t be! Too inaccurate.

Russian Warships in the Age of Sail 1696–1860

Design, Construction, Careers and Fates 

by Tredrea & Sozaev

Britannia may have ruled the waves although at the time Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson wrote his poem Rule, Britannia! in 1740 it was meant as an exhortation, something to aspire to, not a statement of fact.

City of Speed: Los Angeles and the Rise of American Racing

by Joe Scalzo

Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but fact and the correct application thereof is not. The subject matter makes sense, the author is known. All should be well. This 2007 book was lauded by everyone; we beg to differ.

Flying Boats of the Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Ships of the Sky

by Richard Knott

To make the far-flung corners of their empire accessible, the British built a flying boat called—Empire. A fleet of over 40 plied the skies for a decade, until something new and better took its place.

Porsche 911 ST 2.5

by Imhof, Keyser, Barth 

A 911 like no other. Not only was it rare in period, it did so many unique things in its early life that it seems inconceivable that it would just be thrown away. But some people kept looking. And now it lives again.

Powered by Porsche, The Alternative Race Cars

by Roy Smith

“Everyone” knows that Porsche makes serious race cars—but even Porsche geeks will surely not know just how many other makes and teams used Porsche motors and know-how to better their own fortunes, often enough in competition against the provider.

How to be a Good Motorist

by Harold Pemberton

Written in the 1920s this little book seeks to brief new drivers on road etiquette and basic knowledge about owning and operating a motorcar.

Red Tape and White Knuckles: One Woman’s Motorcycle Adventure through Africa

by Lois Pryce

No fancy bike, no fancy gear, no fancy Adventure Tours outfit—just one woman and her little Yamaha taking on the Dark Continent. Sadly, no fancy photographs either—you’ll have to use your imagination.

Betrayed: Secrecy, Lies, and Consequences

by Frederic H. Martini

Being a POW is hard enough. Not being believed afterwards, and even being denied disability benefits is worse. Having someone who knew of your plight but didn’t help be hailed as a hero is . . . well . . . this book will make you question who the good guys are.