Hunting the Wind

by Teresa Webber & Jamie Dodson

A brief but meaningful and certainly heartfelt synopsis of the early years of the airline, in peace and war. Several of the contributors actually worked the boats and all of them bleed Pan Am blue.

Olympic Airways: A History

by Graham Simons

From weather to political leanings there’s a reason Greece was a factor in the plans of the early civil aviation schemers, and in short order the Greeks stood up a national airline of their own. It struggled then and it struggles today, and this book explains why.

Vintage Bentleys in Australia

by Hay, Watson, Schudmak, Johns

Just what the title says, but more because the book also presents the early motoring history on a continent with uncommonly harsh conditions. Bentleys did and do supremely well here, and this book explains why, how, who.

Follmer: American Wheel Man

by Tom Madigan

From throwing around VW Beetles in parking lots as a young kid to being the oldest F1 débutant since the 1950s, Follmer is the consummate racer. Long retired, you can still find him at vintage races, often in the same cars!

Early Soviet Jet Fighters

by Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov

Today’s Su-47 Berkut stealth fighter seems impossibly advanced considering how rocky the Soviets’ start in the jet game was. Lots of new photos and material from previously classified sources shed light on a poorly documented but important chapter of aviation history.

Details – Legendary Sports Cars Up Close: 1965–1969

by Wilfried Müller

“Up close” means just that—views from angles or in settings you don’t often see in books. And for American readers many of the 60 cars shown here will be outliers they’ve probably not seen in real life anyway.

Alan Mann Racing F3L/P68

by Ed Heuvink

A good idea—thwarted by lack of support. In period, the car was hobbled by design and engineering compromises that, once overcome some three decades later, made the P68 the track terror it could have been all along.

Decoding Dylan

by Jim Curtis

The most elusive, enigmatic, inscrutable and problematic songwriter of the Rock era—is it really possible to decode Bob Dylan’s songs? Is Jim Curtis, an academic, up to the task? Read our review and decide for yourself. Decoding Dylan is like untangling a closet full of clothes hangers.

The Story of The America’s Cup 1851–2013

by Ranulf Rayner

Lovely paintings of that crucial event, that exact moment on which a race may have turned are accompanied by a lively history of the men and their “ladies” (the boats!) that vied for the “Auld Mug” over the last 150 years.

Streamlined Dreams

by Jared A. Zichek

The cover car looks almost normal. Would it work? Well, step right in and see for yourself.

Selling the American Muscle Car: Marketing Detroit Iron in the ’60s and ’70s

by Diego Rosenberg

Just the name “muscle car” was enough to make traditional car buyers—adults, male, conservative—shudder at the thought of running into hotrodders and hooligans at the showroom. Quite the pickle for the carmakers’ marketing folks.

Werner Eisele: Motor Racing Photography

by Werner Eisele

Don’t even take the time to read the review—order the book first before someone else does. There are only 3500 copies of this homage to the photographer’s friends in the racing world.