Continental Journeys

by Davide Bassoli

So important is the Continental name to Bentley that the firm chose it for it’s the newest models launched after VW bought the company. This excellent book explains what made them so special.

Damsels in Design

by Constance A. Smith

No one thinks twice about women picking wallpaper and hubby’s wardrobe—but planes, trains, automobiles?? And more than seventy years ago? Only one of the twenty considered here made it a lifetime career but all left their mark.

A Race with Love and Death

by Richard Williams

A young English aristocrat won the 1938 German Grand Prix—as a works driver for Mercedes-Benz, selected by Hitler himself—and became a Nazi hero! There’s plenty of drama right there, and that’s not even scratching the surface.

John, George and the HWMs

by Simon Taylor

Underdogs. Two mechanical engineers, one of whom practically a household name as a quite good race driver, stood up a race team—because they could and because no one else was. They did well, but ask people today about “HWM” . . .

Cars – Driven by Design

by Barbara Til, Dieter Castenow (editors)

Why that era? Sports cars hadn’t become commodities yet. Often quirky, they were designed by individuals or small teams for customers who could afford to not be practical.

The Grand Prix Saboteurs

by Joe Saward

The idea of racing drivers having a side gig as secret agents seems the stuff of fantasy—but it really did happen. Telling that story was long overdue—but the book has become a victim of almost two decades worth of research struggling to remain intelligible.

An English Car Designer Abroad

by Peter Birtwhistle

Recognize the cars on the cover? One man did those and many more, over the course of a 40-year career in which he saw everything—from how to shave clay to designing by committee—change.

The Coventry Motor Industry: Birth to Renaissance

by David Thoms & Tom Donnelly

Coventry is synonymous with both the creation and relative decline of the British motorcar industry. This text explores the relationship between the car industry in its local context, and the wider economic, social and political environment.

Farman: De l’Aviation á l’Automobile

by Claude Rouxel, Laurent Friry

Built to last forever, Farman cars fell victim to their complexity and the value of the raw materials from which they were made. As the first serious study of the marque, there’s every reason to believe this fascinating and long-awaited book will outlast its subject.

The History of Bentley Motors 1919–1931

by Clare Hay

A vastly expanded third edition of the book that had been the standard-bearer all along, written by the person who really is the last word in matters Vintage Bentley.

Richie Ginther, Motor Racing’s Free Thinker

by Richard Jenkins

I hate to see anything broken” is a strong candidate for the most unlikely quotation ever attributed to a Grand Prix driver. But Richie Ginther was no ordinary driver, and no ordinary man. Here is the first-ever authorized biography.

Not Much of an Engineer, An Autobiography

by Sir Stanley Hooker

Gravely ill, this highly acclaimed aero engine engineer managed to stay alive just long enough to finish his autobiography. A modest man, he would have been embarrassed by the praise his eulogists bestowed on him.