Search Result for 'Detroit', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Creative Industries of Detroit

by Leon Dixon

Thousands of projects over several decades came out of Creative, mostly super-secret, and this is the first book about them! Well, some of them, and some of it is necessarily speculative. Still, this book answers questions you couldn’t have known you have.

Selling the American Muscle Car: Marketing Detroit Iron in the ’60s and ’70s

by Diego Rosenberg

Just the name “muscle car” was enough to make traditional car buyers—adults, male, conservative—shudder at the thought of running into hotrodders and hooligans at the showroom. Quite the pickle for the carmakers’ marketing folks.

Once In a Great City, A Detroit Story

by David Maraniss

Greatness comes before the fall, and Detroit was once great. You’ll wish you’d had the chance to experience it yourself but until it becomes great again, this book will have to suffice.

Detroit, An American Autopsy

by Charlie LeDuff

Unless you live under a rock you know this storied US city is suffering. Will your city be next? Not if enough people read this book!

The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford

by Beth Tompkins Bates

Built it and they will come. Henry Ford did a lot more than rethink the assembly line or the $5 workday. He hired African Americans and they left the South and came by the tens of thousands. What did each expect of the other?

The Detroiters

by Harold Livingston

Pulp fiction. After Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 acclaimed film, it is probable that this phrase conjures images that go far beyond the scope of its original essence—who can forget the indelible images of Vincent Vega and Jules Winnfield? And although Livingston’s book has been described as pulp fiction, it really is not in the same league as the sexy crime thrillers.

Automobile Manufacturers of Cleveland and Ohio, 1864–1942

by Frank E. Wrenick with Elaine Wrenick

Automobiles made in Ohio? How about five hundretmarques! Ever hear of a Ben-Hur? If not, this book will add a whole new arsenal of automotive minutia to your lexicon.

1982: The Inside Story of the Sensational Grand Prix Season

by Christopher Hilton

A multitude of factors conspired to make the 1982 season exceptionally turbulent and trying. Political wrangling, a driver’s strike at the first race, fatal crashes, a rather unexpected champion and more, more, more. The book is ten years old but remains a shining beacon.

The Amazing Life of John Cooper Fitch

by Art Evans

“Amazing” doesn’t even begin to exhaust the fullness of the man whose obit described him as “bathed in golden sunlight.” Pilot, racer, sailor, inventor, family man, holder of a speed record—for driving backward.

Maxwell Motor and the Making of the Chrysler Corporation

by Anthony J. Yanik

The list of Maxwell innovations is long, not just in terms of technology but also policy such as marketing specifically to women or hiring a gender-balanced sales force. Once a leading US carmaker, the original firm is long defunct but survives today in the form of Fiat Chrysler.

Telling America’s Story, A History of The Henry Ford

by Miller, Endelman, Braden, Bryk

Henry Ford, the farm boy with a mind for things mechanical, never forgot the values of the rural life that he so comprehensively changed. Collecting the tangible evidence of America’s pre- and early industrial history became his passion and eventually grew into a museum.

Byron J. Carter

by Dean M. Nelson

If you’ve never heard of a Cartercar, you’re not alone—but if your car has an electric starter, you (may) have to thank this prolific inventor, not least because it is said that not having one probably killed him!