Archive for Author 'John Aston', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

VANWALL, The Story of Britain’s first Formula 1 World Champions

by Jenkinson & Posthumus, with D. Nye

Ever noticed the MAHLE logo on a modern race car? British industrialist Tony Vandervell’s old company became part of that group in 2007. He got many things right, including his F1 team.

Inside the Machine: An Engineer’s Tale of the Modern Automotive Industry 

by David Twohig

The author led the engineering teams for three very different vehicles, and his achievements at Nissan, Renault, and Alpine won him an Engineer of the Year Award. If you are ready to see how the sausage is made on the engineering side, this book will show you.

The Car: The Rise and Fall of the Machine that Made the Modern World 

by Bryan Appleyard

The car is dead. Long live the car. A new era is almost here and the days of the current one are definitely numbered. The modern world is unimaginable without the car, so let’s take a look at how it all played out.

MAX: The Dutch Master

by Andre Hoogeboom

Verstappen won the 2021 F1 World Championship and right away a book comes out. Coincidence? Yes, because it was started six years ago, a mere year after he had become the youngest driver to compete in F1.

Lola: The T70 and Can-Am Cars

by Gordon Jones

Go to a big-name vintage race and chances are you’ll see a T70 in action, one of the best-looking race cars of its time. Decades in the making, this book explains the success of the lithe British car with the brawny American motors.

Mike Spence: Out of the Shadows

by Richard Jenkins

He was a man on the move both on the track and in his career but overshadowed by others in both. At his very peak, with a win in reach, he suffered a fatal crash during practice. At long last here is a proper biography to give Spence his due recognition.

Clive’s USA Road Trip

by David James Smitheram

Dave and Clive went on a trip . . . Dave being a British motorsports figure and Clive the Little Red Corvette he bought in California. Dave even went there to collect it in person which of course spells road trip. His little son was too small to go along so dad wrote him this book.

Sam’s Scrapbook: My Motorsports Memories

by Sam Posey with John Posey

Pictures no one has seen and stories no one has heard” says the press release, and it’s mostly true. Pro racer for 17 seasons, broadcaster, raconteur, painter Sam “the Mouth” Posey holds forth once more. He’s 77 and still tearing around his property on his Hammerhead dune buggy. Expect to be entertained.

The Boy: Stirling Moss, A Life in 60 Laps

by Richard Williams

The era-defining British racing driver died in 2020, which will surely spawn a plethora of commemorative books. Williams’ is the first, and, taking a fresh approach, it sets a high bar.

Toymaker: My Journey from War to Wonder

by Tom Karen

Now in his nineties “the man who designed the 1970s” offers here a celebration of creativity. From domestic appliances to transistor radios and furniture to motorcars there was hardly an area of everyday life this industrial designer did not apply himself to.

Admission 7/6 – E.V. Starr Snaps the 60s Speed Merchants

by Tim Beavis and Guy Loveridge

If you have boxes of vintage photos gathering dust in the attic, off with your head. The ones in this book were almost lost to posterity, then someone bought them at auction. As the reviewer says, one look at the cover and you’ll be hooked.

A Race with Love and Death

by Richard Williams

A young English aristocrat won the 1938 German Grand Prix—as a works driver for Mercedes-Benz, selected by Hitler himself—and became a Nazi hero! There’s plenty of drama right there, and that’s not even scratching the surface.