Archive for Author 'John Aston', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

The Boy: Stirling Moss, A Life in 60 Laps

by Richard Williams

The era-defining British racing driver died in 2020, which will surely spawn a plethora of commemorative books. Williams’ is the first, and, taking a fresh approach, it sets a high bar.

Toymaker: My Journey from War to Wonder

by Tom Karen

Now in his nineties “the man who designed the 1970s” offers here a celebration of creativity. From domestic appliances to transistor radios and furniture to motorcars there was hardly an area of everyday life this industrial designer did not apply himself to.

A Race with Love and Death

by Richard Williams

A young English aristocrat won the 1938 German Grand Prix—as a works driver for Mercedes-Benz, selected by Hitler himself—and became a Nazi hero! There’s plenty of drama right there, and that’s not even scratching the surface.

Tom Pryce: Memories of a Welsh F1 Star by Those Who Knew Him

by Darren Banks and Kevin Guthrie 

The Welsh Dragon was active in F1 only a few years and was thought to have the makings of a future world champion, and then a grotesquely bizarre chain of events claimed his life on the track. He was missed then, and as this book shows, is more so now.

Lights Out, Full Throttle

by Johnny Herbert and Damon Hill

Reflections on pro racing by two guys who were there and who nowadays ply their trade as TV commentators. They have opinions, no surprise, and they are all over the place.

Porsche Boxster

by Robert McGowan

The 911 faithful had still not fully embraced the 928 let alone the 944 when Porsche unveiled a mid-engined concept car in 1993. A quarter century later and now in its second generation (fourth if you count the Cayman) the Boxster is doing just fine.

The Fred Opert Story

by Peter R. Hill

If your team’s alumni include, inter alios, Keke Rosberg, Didier Pironi, Tom Pryce, Patrick Tambay and Alan Jones, you really deserve a biography of your own. And now, thanks to Peter Hill, Fred Opert finally has one.

Shadow: The Magnificent Machines of a Man of Mystery

by Pete Lyons

That man of mystery was the quiet if not secretive Don Nichols, founder and principal of the Shadow team/s that competed quite successfully for 11 seasons—before fading into oblivion. For the first time, a proper book connects the dots.

Niki Lauda: The Biography

by Maurice Hamilton

One of the greatest F1 drivers of all time, he died in his sleep at age 70. He had worn many different hats in his life on and off the track, one of them to hide the scars of that near-fatal accident at a race he, then the defending world champion and points leader, considered so unsafe that he attempted to arrange a boycott.

The Blunt End of the Grid

by Dave Roberts

Roberts’ approach to motor racing is the polar opposite to the clinical diligence of an F1 team. The best testament to this book is that if former McLaren head honcho Ron Dennis read it, he would need specialist counselling.

Road Trips, Head Trips, and Other Car-Crazed Writings

Edited by Jean Lindamood Jennings

This book might have been published back when Bill Clinton was beginning his second term in the White House but, if you’re hungry for a tasting menu of the finest car-themed journalism, this anthology will sate gourmet and gourmand alike.

Richie Ginther, Motor Racing’s Free Thinker

by Richard Jenkins

I hate to see anything broken” is a strong candidate for the most unlikely quotation ever attributed to a Grand Prix driver. But Richie Ginther was no ordinary driver, and no ordinary man. Here is the first-ever authorized biography.