Archive for Items Categorized 'Italian', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Berlinetta ‘50s: Rare Italian Coupés of the Fifties

by Christian Descombes, photos by Xavier de Nombel

What makes Italian cars distinctly “Italian” is an evergreen subject and this book offers 37 examples of the sporting variety of La bella macchina to make the point that art (design) nourishes the soul.

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 / 1967

by Patrick Dasse & Martin Übelher

An important race car—whose recorded history was heretofore afflicted by a dearth of reliable data such as chassis numbers or even driver names, making the identification of historic photos so difficult that previous authors were severely handicapped.

Alfa Romeo Junior Z

by Patrick Dasse

The “Z” stands for Zagato so that alone should widen the book’s appeal beyond those Alfisti who want to bone up on a low-production, lightweight, distinctively styled 1970s car. Besides, where did the modern Honda CRX get its inspiration from?

Ferrari 333 SP, A Pictorial History 1993–2003

by Terry O’Neil

The most successful Ferrari ever run in Prototype racing was only ever campaigned by privateers. And only 40 were built. Of which only 27 raced. Why are there no serious books about this?? Well, now there is.

Lamborghini Murciélago 

by Thillainathan “Path” Pathmanathan 

What’s a supercar really like, day in/day out, on hot dates, fast laps, and ruinous service appointments? Written by a knowledgeable owner the book looks at Lamborghini’s flagship in the context of its predecessors and tells pretty much all.

Alleggerita

by Tony Adriaensens, Patrick Dasse & Martin Übelher

The Giulia GTA, GTA SA, GTA Junior, and GTAm were probably the most important postwar four-cylinder Alfa Romeos. This high-concept 1500-page opus offers a wealth of detail.

Alfa Romeo Montreal

by Patrick Dasse

If the Montreal is famous for anything it is the company it keeps in its designer’s portfolio. Gandini penned designs as different as the immortal Miura and Countach, and closer to this car the Marzal and Carabo concepts. This book presents period photos.

Alfa Romeo Arese

by Patrick Dasse

An Arese is not an Alfa model but the place where they were made, and this book contains hundreds of archival photos from AR about it.

The Ferrari Book: Passion for Design 

by Jürgen Lewandowski

Is there such a thing as too many Ferraris? Or too many Ferrari books? Nah. But this 10-pounder has challenges beyond its mere heft. Those Michael Zumbrunn photos, though. Bellisima.

Abarth: Racing Cars – Collection 1949–1974

by Franz Steinbacher

This is a look at a highly curated Swiss collection of mostly racing Abarths, and in telling their story the book also gives a good idea of what made the cars and the company so special.

Zagato Milano 1919–2009, The Official Book

This book does not come right out and say what it is. Neither do the press release or the advertising copy. If you know of Nada’s other Zagato books you would assume this new one to be along the lines of those others. It isn’t.

Ferraris in Australia in the 1950s and 1960s

by Barry Farr

Some US metropolitan areas have larger populations of Ferraris than the 65 examples of sports, race or road cars that went Down Under between 1952 and 1972 when the Australian Ferrari Register was founded. The author is a native and a Ferrari owner and so has the motivation and the connections to trace the cars.