Archive for Author 'Sabu Advani', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930–1945

by Robert Forsyth & Eddie Creek

From Brazil to China, the German Ju 52 proved its mettle, first as a pioneering airliner and then as the indomitable warhorse. Many books have been written about its many roles, this is one of the best.

Building the B-17 Flying Fortress

by Bill Yenne

Well-trodden ground, you think. Turns out there’s a whole lot left to see. Aside from its photographic riches this book is a good synopsis of not only all B-17 variants and manufacturing blocks but also the overall development of the bomber as a strategic tool.

The Rootes Story, The Making of a Global Automotive Empire  

by Geoff Carverhill 

Rootes is about as British a carmaker/distributor as it gets but US connections abound, not least the Raymond Loewy one. This book is quite the deep dive and dispenses lots of detail in a very readable manner.

Delage, Records et Grand Prix

by Daniel Cabart & Sébastien Faurès Fustel de Coulanges

The marque went racing within a year of its founding. Outside of Delage circles it is not fully appreciated just how competent their racing cars were. This book puts one of the three distinct periods of success under the microscope. And we mean microscope.

Porsche 356: Made by Reutter

by Frank Jung

For the first time ever a book reproduces some of the correspondence between the two firms, illustrating not just business details but the dynamics. Also, excerpts from oral histories accompany hundreds of photos from the shop floor.

Indy Split: The Big Money Battle that Nearly Destroyed Indy Racing

by John Oreovicz

Big-time open-wheel racing in America is big business. And money is, as they say, the root of all evil. Followed by ego. If you can talk about CART, USAC, CRL, and IRL in the same sentence you know what this book will be about. It’s a bruising read—but there’s a happy end.

GT Love, 50 Years Opel GT

by Jens Cooper & Harald Hamprecht

This little Opel, the first-ever German concept car (1965), has more American connections that just being called the “baby Corvette.” As GM’s European subsidiary several US execs who would become industry heavyweights shaped the fates of this machine.

Yakolev Fighters of World War Two

by Yefim Gordon, Sergey & Dmitriy Komissarov

Everyone knows Mustangs and Spits and FW 109s, but Yaks? These Russian fighters were crude only by comparison but fundamentally no less competent. Based on newly released material these veteran authors advance the story another big step.

Porsche 911 ST 2.5

by Imhof, Keyser, Barth 

A 911 like no other. Not only was it rare in period, it did so many unique things in its early life that it seems inconceivable that it would just be thrown away. But some people kept looking. And now it lives again.

Mercedes 300 SL, Car of the Century

by Hans Kleissl and Harry Niemann

A truly different book about a car that so much has already been written about. No wonder, considering who the authors are.

The Face of Change: Portraits of Automotive Evolution

by John Nikas & Michael Furman

Cars have changed over time. Obviously. Suppose one analyzed the past and isolated specific reasons, could future change become predictable? If this is too highbrow just geek out on the sumptuous photos.

The Last Shelby Cobra: My Times with Carroll Shelby

by Chris P. Theodore

Carroll Shelby doesn’’t seem to have had an idle day in his long life and to the end was hatching new ideas. This book by a Ford exec who worked with him looks at the last 20-odd years.