Archive for Items Categorized 'Biography/ Autobiography', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Hello, I’m Paul Page: “It’s Race Day in Indianapolis”

by Paul Page & J.R. Elrod

Could auto racing reporting be Emmy-worthy? You bet—Page did it twice! He probably could have brought excitement to reading the telephone directory out loud. From the X Games to hot dog eating contests, this memoir covers six decades in the broadcast booth.

Spellbinder, The Life of James J. Nance

by Stuart R. Blond

If the name of James Nance brings to mind “Studebaker Packard,” it’s not usually in a friendly way. He had the misfortune of presiding over the ambitious automaker’s final years—and is often enough blamed for them. There’s never been a book written about his working and personal life until now so be prepared to reevaluate that assessment.

Mr. Le Mans: Tom Kristensen

by Tom Kristensen with Dan Philipsen

Sebring has a Kristensen corner, Le Mans has had him on the podium more times than anyone else. Many are the feathers in his cap. But is he a nice guy? Why, yes—meet him here.

Al Unser Jr.—A Checkered Past

as told to Jade Gurss

“There and back again” could be the theme of this story. It is not about image-burnishing but unblinking candor about the highest highs and the lowest lows, and that racing, even successfully, is not everything.

Mike Spence: Out of the Shadows

by Richard Jenkins

He was a man on the move both on the track and in his career but overshadowed by others in both. At his very peak, with a win in reach, he suffered a fatal crash during practice. At long last here is a proper biography to give Spence his due recognition.

Herbert Müller – “…alles zu langsam!”

by Födisch and Roßbach

If you followed racing in the hairy 1960–80 era you could not have failed to notice this Swiss driver. This biography is deep in the best sense. The reason it was written is to commemorate the saddest of occasions.

Sam’s Scrapbook: My Motorsports Memories

by Sam Posey with John Posey

Pictures no one has seen and stories no one has heard” says the press release, and it’s mostly true. Pro racer for 17 seasons, broadcaster, raconteur, painter Sam “the Mouth” Posey holds forth once more. He’s 77 and still tearing around his property on his Hammerhead dune buggy. Expect to be entertained.

A Clearing in the Distance: Frederick Law Olmsted and America in the Nineteenth Century

by Witold Rybczynski

Olmsted was already dead by the time transportation systems became the arteries of modern life but a not entirely unrelated topic, conservation, which is certainly a pressing issue today, found in him an early advocate and activist. You’ve trod in his footsteps and may not even have known it.

Driven: The Men Who Made Formula One

by Kevin Eason

A colorful look by a long-time observer at the forces that turned a sport into a circus in which staggering amounts of money are to be made by those few who already have money—or genius or luck or connections—to even get a seat at the table.

Tom Tjaarda: Master of Proportions

by Gautam Sen

From Ferraris to furniture and tires to typewriters, Tjaarda left a mark, a big mark, and it takes a big book to tell it all. Tjaarda was very keen to have this author write that book, but he didn’t live to see it finished.

The Swiss Wiz: Edi Wyss, Ein Leben mit Renn- und Sportwagen

by Edi Wyss and Christoph Ditzler

If you travel in certain circles you know this name. Even with a couple hundred well-captioned photos of cars and places you’ll recognize, you’ll wish you spoke German and hear him tell his story in his own voice.

Jas A Munro & Co – The Largest Garage in Melbourne

by Ian Berg

One of the largest motor agents in Australia, Munro also ran a service and coachbuilding facility, adding a host of other businesses over time. The chance discovery of the Munro archive, unseen for nearly a century, sheds light on early motoring in a harsh country.