Archive for Items Categorized 'Automobiles', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Morgan Three Wheeler: Back to the Future

by Peter Dron

Looks vintage but is entirely modern. Costs $50K and has minimal creature comforts. Oh, it’s “missing” a wheel. No roof either. Over 1500 sold since 2011. See what you’re missing.

Porsche Boxster

by Robert McGowan

The 911 faithful had still not fully embraced the 928 let alone the 944 when Porsche unveiled a mid-engined concept car in 1993. A quarter century later and now in its second generation (fourth if you count the Cayman) the Boxster is doing just fine.

Alfa Romeo Junior Z

by Patrick Dasse

The “Z” stands for Zagato so that alone should widen the book’s appeal beyond those Alfisti who want to bone up on a low-production, lightweight, distinctively styled 1970s car. Besides, where did the modern Honda CRX get its inspiration from?

Ferrari 333 SP, A Pictorial History 1993–2003

by Terry O’Neil

The most successful Ferrari ever run in Prototype racing was only ever campaigned by privateers. And only 40 were built. Of which only 27 raced. Why are there no serious books about this?? Well, now there is.

Car Tales, Classic Stories About Dream Machines

Five short stories by names you’ll mostly recognize, with unrelated but interesting photographs.

Park Ward: The Innovative Coachbuilder 

by Malcolm Tucker

It’s a good time to be alive: Park Ward is a hundred years old this year but only now do we have here the first proper book about it, so thorough—over 1200 pages, and it only covers 20 years!—that it is also likely the last.

Louis Coatalen

by Oliver Standerwick Heal 

A portrait of charm and wit, and an “eye on the prize” sort of determination that could be quite ruthless. You may not know the name but you use stuff that has his fingerprints on it even if you don’t realize it. Someone spent twenty years writing this book—read it!

Neo Classics: From Factory to Legendary in 0 Seconds

by René Staud & Jürgen Lewandowski

If it doesn’t look as if there will be a Bugatti or McLaren or Pagani under the Christmas tree—ask for this book as a consolation price. Its cover is so glam it doesn’t even need wrapping paper!

Something New Under the Sun, The History of America’s First Car

by Carol Jean Lambert

Not, not Henry Ford but the author’s great-grandfather, in 1891. Didn’t know that? Well, this book is well intended, and colorful, but a bit light on the sort of data that engineering folk would crave.

Mr Radley Drives to Vienna

by John Kennedy

Look closely at that cover. Looks like a color print of a b/w photo, right? No! Everything is re-staged—a hundred years apart.

First Principles: The Official Biography of Keith Duckworth OBE

by Norman Burr

He was behind the most successful engines in racing history, and his company, Cosworth, became a major player. He had the complex personality that seems inseparable from such overachievement, and this book, at last, tells the story.

The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford

by Beth Tompkins Bates

Built it and they will come. Henry Ford did a lot more than rethink the assembly line or the $5 workday. He hired African Americans and they left the South and came by the tens of thousands. What did each expect of the other?