Search Result for 'American auto', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Power Under Her Foot, Women Enthusiasts of American Muscle Cars

by Chris Lezotte

Pretty young women were featured in ads as passengers or spectators implying these were the lasses the target audience—men—would attract. This book examines how women have moved into the driver’s seat rumbling to work and shows in modern day muscle cars.

The Rootes Story, The Making of a Global Automotive Empire  

by Geoff Carverhill 

Rootes is about as British a carmaker/distributor as it gets but US connections abound, not least the Raymond Loewy one. This book is quite the deep dive and dispenses lots of detail in a very readable manner.

A History of Auto Racing in New England

Dick Berggren, editor

Unless you live there you probably had no idea how long ago racing started in that region. This excellent book connects many dots that extend far beyond those six states.

Junkyard Nights: Haunting NorCal’s Automotive Graveyards

by Troy Paiva

A night at the graveyard, what’s not to . . . love? This light painting photographer has been lighting up the night for over 30 years and published several books showcasing his observations.

Tony Bettenhausen & Sons: An American Racing Family Album

by Gordon Kirby

In all walks of life one finds families in which several generations engage in the same activity. Over several decades and different series the Bettenhausens were almost uncommonly successful in auto racing but also paid an uncommonly heavy price in that only one of the four survived.

Duesenberg, The Mightiest American Motor Car

by J.L. Elbert

Did the individual marque history genre begin in 1973, as has been argued, with the publication by Automobile Quarterly of its histories of Cadillac and Corvette? This book, now nearly forgotten, clearly set the stage nearly 25 years earlier. And it still deserves a spot on the serious enthusiast’s bookshelf.

The American Steam Locomotive in the Twentieth Century

by Tom Morrison

So, so big—and so, so inefficient. But the industrialized world could not have become what it did without these behemoths, so here is a behemoth of a book to tell their story.

American Light Trucks & Utility Vehicles, 1967 to 1989

by J “Kelly” Flory Jr

In an age in which Ford’s F-Series has been the best-selling pickup truck in the US since 1977 it’s easy to lose sight of what else was/is out there. Whether it’s to settle a bet, check a fact, or just get lost in the cars and trucks of yesteryear, Flory’s books are unsurpassed for detail and accuracy.

The State of American Hot Rodding

by David Lawrence Miller

As American as Jazz but hot rodding is the very picture of old-school—so how will the hobby attract the next generation of enthusiasts?

The Automobile Book

by the editors of The Saturday Evening Post

This American magazine was founded in 1821 and became a weekly in 1897 reaching millions of homes. It covered current events—and the automobile and the people behind and around it were most certainly that. Here is a collection of ads, commentaries, poems, stories, essays, reminiscences, and illustrations.

Deutscher Automobil-Rennsport 1946–1955

by Reinald Schumann

Zero-Hour means the immediate postwar years, the years in which war-ravaged Germany clawed its way back into the civilized—and mechanized—world. A-racing we must go!

Probably the most thorough book to date, with hundreds of photos, many of which new to the record.

Enzo Ferrari – Power, Politics, and the Making of an Automotive Empire

by Luca Dal Monte

Every minute you spend reading this review, Ferrari will sell 100 items with their name on them. Not cars—they, intentionally, hover around the 8000 per year mark—but “stuff,” from socks to books to engines for Maseratis. What is it about Ferrari that so many want to buy into its cachet? 1000 pages offer some answers.