Archive for Items Categorized 'US', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Glamour Road

by Jeff Stork and Tom Dolle

Few “movements” touched so many aspects of life and lifestyle as that archly American endevor we now call Midcentury Modern: architecture, fashion, consumer goods, graphics, even gender roles. How do cars fit the dictum of clean lines, absence of decorative embellishments, and honest use of materials? This book shows how it all meshes.

Shipwrecked and Rescued, Cars and Crew

by Larry Jorgensen

Winter 1926. A cargo freighter sinks. Thousands of others have sunk in the Great Lakes but what makes this story different is that not only the crew was rescued but the cargo—over 240 new cars, one of which lived to see its odo roll past 200,000 miles.

Art Fitzpatrick & Van Kaufman, Masters of the Art of Automobile Advertising

by Rob Keil

Previously unpublished sketches, studies, and reference photos show two automotive artists and their team at work, thanks to unprecedented access to their archives

Lost Muscle Car Dealerships

by Duncan S. Brown

A complete list of dealerships that once specced their own souped-up cars or sponsored customers’ race cars, if it were even possible to compile one, would number more than the 17 presented here. This book also includes Canadian ones.

Detroit Steel Artists

by Matthew Kilkenny

Ray Dietrich probably designed more custom and semi-custom cars than any other designer of the Classic Car Era. This is the book about Dietrich and others and those cars.

Cobra Jet: The History of Ford’s Greatest High-Performance Muscle Cars

by Rob Kinnan & Diego Rosenberg

From its launch in 1968 to right now, Ford’s Cobra Jet has moved the needle and so does this fine book that separates the wheat from the chaff in a story that has been told too often for its own good.

Hot Rod

by Henry Gregor Felsen

Hank Felson didn’t write only car books but this one, part of a rodding series, was his best seller: eight million copies over the years. See why.

Shelby Cobras: CSX 2001–CSX 2125

by Robert D. Walker

Not only does this 1000-page opus represent the most rigorously researched account of all Mk I chassis, it adds into the record material from an entirely new archive—fished out of a dumpster a few years ago!

Ford GT40 Anthology

by John S. Allen and Graham Endeacott

Subtitled “A Unique Compilation of Stories” the book is exactly that. Even old hands will find new bits here; in fact, they’ll have to unlearn a few. What more could one want in a book!

The History of GM’s Ramjet Fuel Injection

by Kenneth W. Kayser

Ramjet fuel injection has been around since the 1950s—and you can still order it straight out of the current Chevrolet Performance Parts catalog. But the new electronic version has only visual similarities to the old mechanical system—and none of its problems. This book by a long-time GM engineer has the whole story.

Spellbinder, The Life of James J. Nance

by Stuart R. Blond

If the name of James Nance brings to mind “Studebaker Packard,” it’s not usually in a friendly way. He had the misfortune of presiding over the ambitious automaker’s final years—and is often enough blamed for them. There’s never been a book written about his working and personal life until now so be prepared to reevaluate that assessment.

Hot Rod Dreams: Car Shows and Culture

by Larry Erickson and David Boulé

A guy paints signs for a car show in the 1950s. A decade later he becomes one of the founders of the International Show Car Association. Seems like someone stumbled into a career. For Bob Larivee Sr. it was a calling, and this is his story.