Archive for Author 'Bill Wolf', only excerpts shown, click title for full entry.

Rolling Sculpture: A Designer and His Work

by Gordon M. Buehrig with William S. Jackson

Many of you will know the cars: the coffin-nosed Cords, the dual-cowl Duesenbergs and the elegant Continental Mark II. Some of you may know the name Gordon Buehrig–the mind and the hand that conceived them.

The Black Echo

by Michael Connelly

To fully enjoy a series of well-done detective novels, it is both entertaining and enlightening to start with the first one and read ‘em all sequentially. Michael Connelly’s Bosch procedurals are well worth the effort.

The Great Influenza

by John M. Barry

You think Covid 19 is a horror show? How about the influenza pandemic of 1918? Read this book, although you may find it too close to our current tribulations.

Car Tales, Classic Stories About Dream Machines

Five short stories by names you’ll mostly recognize, with unrelated but interesting photographs.

Rolls-Royce and Bentley In the 80s and 90s

by Richard Vaughan

Many of these models are still on the road—still looking sleek and stylish. Filled with detailed information and attractive images, this book is a good resource for those who hold an interest in them. Anyone considering the purchase of one may be astounded by the many and expensive problems endemic to these cars.

Coachwork on Rolls-Royce and Bentley 1945–1965

by James Taylor

The period covered by this bookmarks the transition from custom to increasingly standardized bodies, and not even ultra luxury marques were spared. This book looks at both types, highlighting the output of 56 British and Continental firms.

Lovers and Other Strangers: Jack Vettriano

by Anthony Quinn

Perhaps you’ve seen a print of Vettriano’s The Singing Butler in a friend’s home. Perhaps you own a copy yourself. As wonderful as that painting is, it is overshadowed by the artist’s noir paintings. This book is a fine introduction to the work of this controversial, enigmatic Scottish painter.

That Thin, Wild Mercury Sound

by Daryl Sanders

Bob Dylan’s first album was released in 1962. Since then he has recorded over three dozen studio albums. He is still actively recording and performing. With all that material, it would be difficult to pick a favorite, but there seems to be a general agreement that his 1966 Blonde On Blonde is the best of the best. Sander’s book tells a very detailed, very lively tale of its making.

3-D Movies

by R.M. Hayes

The “hyperhaptic visuality” in Avatar in 2009 may have created a lot of hoopla—only to then fizz out again—but the 3D film process was already over a hundred years old by then! From specific movies to how they’re made and on what equipment, this book by an industry insider is a good overview.

Decoding Dylan

by Jim Curtis

The most elusive, enigmatic, inscrutable and problematic songwriter of the Rock era—is it really possible to decode Bob Dylan’s songs? Is Jim Curtis, an academic, up to the task? Read our review and decide for yourself. Decoding Dylan is like untangling a closet full of clothes hangers.

Rat Rod Magazine

Editor: Steve Thaemert

So ugly they are beautiful. At least to some. Rat Rods—an acquired automotive taste? Rat Rod Magazine is proudly published in the USA by veterans. In some ways it is substantially different from your typical hot rod magazine.

Want To Hold Your Hand / This Boy

The Beatles

All right, so it’s a record.. . . There’s more to life than car books, dontchaknow, and we are, after all, inquisitive folk. So read this. Or don’t.